Mar 312009
 

A cross-post from the LAMP blog I also run: LAMP mentored ‘Social Media, Multi-Platform’ Drama Scorched won the coveted International Interactive Emmy Award from the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences last night at MIP TV. The first time Australia has won this award.

A big congratulations particularly to producers Marcus Gillezeau and Ellenor Cox from Firelight Productions. These awards are held annually at MIP TV in Cannes and celebrate the most innovative drama, documentary, informational and entertainment services delivered on multiple platforms.

iemmy-awardThrough these awards, the International Academy of Television Arts & Sciences is celebrating a significantly growing sector of the television industry and recognize excellence in content created and designed for viewer interaction and/or delivery on a digital platform.

The 2009 Winners.

Fiction category winners “Scorched” Firelight Productions in association with Essential Media & Goalpost Pictures, Australia

Non-fiction category winners “Britain From Above,” BBC / Lion, United Kingdom

Children and young people category winners “Battlefront”, Channel 4, United Kingdom

Brian Seth Hurst (Second Vice Chair at Academy of Television Arts & Sciences and CEO at The Opportunity Management Company) who helps organise these awards sent through this Twitpic of himself (mid left), Chris Hilton from Essential Media and Entertainment (far left), Marcus Gillezeau (mid right) and Mike Cowap (Innovation Head at Screen Australia – far right), at the after awards (30 minutes ago!). Picture from Brian Seth Hurst (actual photographer as yet unknown).

iemmy_awards_scorched_brianhurstpic

The story has also been covered in The Hollywood Reporter, TVAusCast,  TV Tonight, Digital Media, Campaign Brief, ShowHype and NineMSN

Digital Media magazine has a few ‘delegates’ over there at the moment who are twittering events as they happen you can follow them here. This is how we found out about the award over here from several other tweeters…

  • PipRMB: Aussie digital media company Firelight Prods. have won the first ever International Digital Emmy for best drama for Scorched – huge congrats
  • BrianSethHurst: Winner Fiction Int’l Digital Emmy Award “Scorched” Australia Goalpost Media, Essential Media
  • FanTrust: Check out Scorched which just won a digital Emmy— outstanding fictional drama for 3 screens. Live from #miptv

The Digital Media magazine also featured an article prior to MIP TV referring to LAMP’s involvement in the project –

“Meanwhile the makers of NineMSN cross-platform drama Scorched, Marcus Gillezeau, Ellenor Cox, Michael O’Neill and Brad Hayward, have been nominated for an International Digital Emmy Award. The awards ceremony will be held on March 30 at the MipTV conference. Scorched was financed by Nine Network, ITV International, Screen Australia and the New South Wales Film and Television Office and developed through the Australian Film Television & Radio School’s Laboratory of Advanced Media Production (LAMP), which is Australia’s premier emerging media research and development production lab.”

Other awards winners noted by TV Week

The International Academy of Television Arts & Sciences revealed the winners for the International Digital Emmy Awards at the MIP TV opening festivities in Cannes, France.

Australia won its first International Digital Emmy award in the fiction category for “Scorched.”

The non-fiction category went to “Britain From Above,” while “Battlefront” won the children and young people category. Both programs were from the U.K.

Below is a shot of the team with Jackie Turnure (far right – now at Hoodlum) back in May 2006 when they started planning the Social Media elements of the experience on a LAMP residential. There were then several follow up sessions with them to help crystallize their ideas. (Pic Catherine Gleeson)

Scorched has received a great deal of attention and commentary from press and also those closer to the project. This is the LAMP post about the launch, here is Guy Gadney at MIPTV at the moment (then head of PBL New Media, Channel 9) and Gary Hayes (LAMP Director’s personal media blog). It is great news that another LAMP connected project has won the International Emmy’s – examples of earlier ones included Jim Shomos (LAMP mentor) with his Forget the Rules projects, the winner of the Ogilvy Amex award by then LAMP mentor Jackie Turner and other LAMP projects such as The Deep Sleep won development awards too.

xeno_cannes01-ghayesPrevious iiEmmy award winners in related categories have included Canadian Xenophile’s Alternate Reality Doco/Drama Regenesis and Total Drama Island plus fellow Canadian’s Zinc Roe with their Zimmer Twins service (now featured globally).

Link to the Canadian’s winning most awards two years ago here and the image below is of the two teams during the awards taken by Gary Hayes.

Apr 182007
 

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(Thanks to Rory Sutherland of Ogilvy for that image). A brief, as at mid conference, ones mind is too distracted to put together a reflective, long format piece for a media blog (well I suppose that’€™s the nature of blogs!) -€“ and also there is very little time to sit back and write this stuff (yes being in Cannes is not all free parties and hanging around the beaches ‘€“ well for sad people like me’ it isn’€™t 😉 ). End of second day from Milia and the week is panning out as last year into very well defined areas focusing on burning issues:

The tension between traditional TV and broadband alternatives ‘€“ several online video superpanels.
What the heck should we do next ‘€“ The pitching panels demonstrating that companies like BBC have less and less in-house creativity that can truly engage the new audience
How to reach the audience ‘€“ a good second half to Tuesday looking at new forms of marketing and advertising
Are new platforms really offering opportunities – The usual cursory look at mobile and innovative broadband web

Any way onto some things that resonated with me ‘€“ these come across as negative on re-reading, perhaps suggesting things are maturing – a sort of things to tweak as opposed to the surprise one gets when…’€œwhat TV folk are starting to think about this stuff!’€

We like to play
Before I start with these little nuggets I must say I am staggered to see the lack of acknowledgement in many of my private discussions, keynotes and panels on the impact of online games ‘€“ whether virtual world or MMORPGs. The dominance of the TV market 2 floors below in the ‘€˜car boot sale’€™ environment of MipTV suggests that until games are brought back into Milia then all the ‘€˜new’€™ stuff will be focused on how to deliver TV (programmes and commercials) to online and mobile. This is manifest in the format of the week. OK a nod to virtual worlds in a keynote and short parallel panel, but I have only once heard for example World of Warcraft mentioned and that was me in a question! Please, please organisers to ignore such a rich seam of audience activity doesn’€™t make sense. A panel called ‘€œRole of Games in Cross-Media Entertaintment’€ (featuring the switched on Deborah Todd) will I hope suggest, that TV producers will only be ready for this new world when they understand and more importantly play games themselves.

Lack of BBC Vision
The new creative director of BBC Vision (Richard Williams) actually clearly showed the BBC has little vision for future services by playing a trailer in the Commissioning for all Screens, that was circa 2003. How many times do we have to see Walking with Beasts interactive (and other tired red button apps like Death in Rome) shown as an example of the BBC responding to change? WWB iTV is actually circa 2001 when Tim Haines and I took it to the then Controller of TV, Mark Thompson but at least Richard talked about a few ‘€˜listen to the audience’€™ projects which is very hard for the BBC – “have you considered the problems of moderation?” that oft line put to projects pitched at them. Another thing that is hard is finding a way within the organization to both creatively ‘€˜grow ideas, commission and produce (to quote Richard’€¦)

‘€œ’€¦this is the first time that the BBC has actually split up its commissioning and production of new media content’€¦a fairer system, I personally think the old system was pretty fair but this is going to better we hope’€’€¦

The 360 pitching sessions are being steered by the laid back and passionate Frank Boyd. He is also running lots of Innovation labs, with apparently half of the submitted projects getting some further development ‘€“ not surprising as the submissions into the labs are likely to be all the cross-platform ideas coming into the BBC! This may suggest as I said last year, an openess and willingness to work with external producers but it also pangs of a lack of direction – I shall feedback on the pitching sessions and final evening winners in a coming post. But the BBC’s current narrow focus on a way for its audience to get at video content (eg: iPlayer and YouTube) seems to be addressing only a small part of what needs to be done and endless restructuring and shuffling of the same people (or those so-called enlightened ones from other traditional departments) will not move them forward. I get the feeling that most of the true creatives have been swept out of BBC New Media leaving ‘trusted’ producers and ‘€˜audience figure’€™ managers? I hope though to be wowed by the quality of the pitches today, Wednesday, for the various BBC categories and of course by Ashley and Jana Bennetts steerage keynotes later in the day.

We know we can deliver video online!
I attended a few of the ‘€˜online’€™ video/TV panels, but little has changed since last year and I think Ferhan should cull the video over web and mobile back a bit. The most interesting thing to come out seems to be the polarisation caused by viewer created content. It falls into two camps ‘€œits all crap and we don’€™t need to worry about it’€ or ‘€œviewers are spending more time watching this crap rather than ours!, so lets worry’€. Most folk now trip out the oft said business model mix of a bit of subscription there and a bit of ad funded here as a catch all to how the online video biz is being monetised.

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A surprising number are quick to totally dismiss pay-per-play as an effective model? This seems odd when we still live in a blockbuster age. What happened to the old keep 80% of people honest and they will not drift over to the dark side of bit torrent or pirated DVDs ‘€“ make it easy for them to stay honest. Apple/EMI strategy was given the ‘€˜ummm lets see’€™ by many yet all agreed DRM is a waste of time. In the Broadband Video Explosion SuperPanel Rick Sands (COO of MGM ‘€“ and who sounds a bit like Nick Cage) was most entertaining for the fact that he was clear that the industry is still broken into distinct parts. The Pipes, as he called them ‘€“ looking at the CEO of Joost, Fredrik De Wahl (who showed an impressive vid over web demo) ‘€“ should stay clear of content. They don’€™t understand, for example, advertising which for the most part is made by an industry where perhaps 25% actually know what they are doing’€¦which leads nicely onto’€¦

‘€œThe audience is fragmenting, fragment with them.’€ © Joseph Jaffe
Now where have I heard that before 😉 Through Tuesday afternoon a series of presenters and panels looked at new form advertising and marketing. I loved Rory Sutherland’€™s (Vice Chair Ogilvy UK) presentation which on one hand showed a disconnect ‘€“ he came across as a Lord of Advertising looking down on the sprawling proletariat hoard but on the other hand seemed very understanding and sympathetic with audience needs. I suspect those are the two key qualities of a great marketing person ‘€“ empathy combined with arms length. Other people in the marketing field though are less approachable and seem to be very nervous about what is happening, behind their thin veneer of public confidence.

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I was also struck by the alternative marketing methods that many were tripping out too. Lots of talk about longer form video across all platforms, viewers doing their own satire videos on existing media (and how we should not touch them “copying is the best form of flattery”?) or keeping an eye on what the audience is saying about them BUT as I mentioned earlier there was little talk about ‘€˜play’€™ or immersion. Branded playful adverts were hardly touched on so the whole field of ARG’€™s, Scavenger Hunts and In-Game advertising was not even skimmed over. To disregard a human’€™s desire to play seems odd for an industry aimed at fulfilling need ‘€“ this especially resonated with me when I went along to the ‘€œFreshTV presentation’€ post lunch. The WIT fronted by Virginia Mouseler presented what she/they think are the best new TV formats around the world. Not surprisingly most were cross reality/games – a new term I developed during the sessions ‘€˜Gality Show’€™ (yes it is late writing this) ‘€“ but back to advertising. Some speakers said commercials and advertising are separate ‘€“ so pay for good content and leave it alone (do not product place or steer the editorial), this seems again very odd in a world where some of the most widely viewed content is reality the most seen on-demand being ‘€˜users reality’€™ (as in user generated video about their lives) – again not referred too. So surely advertisers need to work around, within and alongside what TV is turning into. Most TV in less than 5 years will be reality focused and that means ‘€“ Sport, The Audience, Reality Game Shows, News and Reality Drama (yes endless CSI’€¦). One of the marketeers who falls into the keep ads and programmes separate is’€¦

Joseph Jaffe who delivered a nice theoretical keynote based on his now old-in-the-tooth, marketing book ‘€˜Life after the 30 second spot’€ ‘€“ already three years old. Again I often think back to the endless work/discussions that TV-Anytime and I did with advertisers circa 2001 when the impact of the PDR (Personal Digital Recorder) was documented in many forms. Much of what we see in marketing today is simply based on anytime, anywhere, anyhow media ‘€“ and more significantly how to respond to that ‘€“ this was coming over the horizon for many a decade ago, yet the same noises are still being made and combined with the obvious impact of social networks consultants have lots of work in the coming years. Something that stuck out from Joseph’€™s assertive diatribe then was that everyone in marketing, including Joseph himself, are floundering to implement real world, effective marketing strategies. How to reach out and allow audiences to reach in and knowing what to do, actually – to use his expression when describing the many media and product based companies he has talked to ‘€œhelp us understand what comes next’€. He came across as passionate about the area but the content became overtly theoretical with lots of semantic juggling and an over reliance on power ‘€˜points’€™ ‘€“ eg: the four c’€™s, acronyms EPIC, play on words Return on Experimentation (ROE) and so on. Here is a little quote that resonated

‘€œSponsor your Consumer. A lot of people talk of consumer generated content and the thing that I constantly hear is that the quality is crap, they are not producing really high quality pieces of content. But I don’€™t think consumers care. If they are producing quality or low quality commercials or content why not help them. Send them a producer, why not actually raise the collective tide and make the work better. Even if you don’€™t do that remember that consumers aren’€™t creating this for you they are creating it for themselves. Heres a good example I call sponsoring your consumer. Instead of sponsoring the Olympic Games why not sponsor that one consumer that is really passionate about something’€

I suppose like most consultants he was advertising himself (this person seems to know what they are talking about lets give them a go) without revealing steps that work. I did warm to him when he answered my question about in-game marketing and he cited a couple of reasonable examples and also gave me a copy of the book which I will virally distribute via a local library I know without a copy. There is a second book coming out called ‘€œJoin in the Conversation’€ likely about marketeers becoming part of the global discussion about everything and anything – which shows there is life after the book’€œLife after the 30 second spot’€

© Gary Hayes 2007

Apr 172007
 

(Disclaimer: Writing this from a noisy, smokey opening party at the Martinez Hotel on the Croisette in Cannes)…I am currently taking in the wonders of another Milia in Cannes in the South of France on behalf of LAMP @ AFTRS. There is a great line up of speakers, organised again by my old friend Ferhan Cook, who I touched base with earlier today. I will be blogging, as last year, of significant events or activities but mostly focusing on the twenty plus great seminars. Already the climate here on the first day has been one of a mature acceptance of the deep changes going on in the TV industry to the extent that TV is now only a part of the media mix – remember Milia is paired with Mip (which used to be called MipTV). One announcement that caught my eye today was the recent teaming up of Endemol and EA on a service called Virtual Me

CANNES, FRANCE, – April 16, 2007 – Electronic Arts (NASDAQ: ERTS), the world’s leading interactive entertainment software company, and the Endemol group, a global leader in television and other audiovisual entertainment, today announced a creative partnership for the development of Virtual Me, a new digital entertainment concept that bridges the divide between traditional TV and videogames. The all-new online offering is being prepared to debut in Endemol’s top-rated Big Brother.

I actually stumbled across this not through the official channels of Milia press releases on the ground (although it was mentioned at a session later on the first day) but at a blog called “Brand Strategy” that actually references a sticky post I did called “Witnessing the Birth of an Entertainment Form” on the Virtual Big Brother from many moons ago. I hope to catch up with some Endemol folk on Thursday as we will be graced by Phil Rosedale of Linden Lab and a host of other Second Life developers in a group of sessions about brands and marketing in the metaverse. Of course I am mentioning The Project Factory to folk and some of the great ‘mixed reality’ projects we have done at LAMP to key people who are now warming to the idea of these cross-over reality, virtual world formats.

It seems though that Endemols experiment with Big Brother has been noted and it is now moving forward apace with the metaverse. The 3D web will be therefore quite likely be more swamped with TV forms and brands rather than advertising in its crudest incarnation. There is something rather obvious in the evolution implied by this statement (and indeed in many from my posts of the previous months)

Want to be a pop star? A movie star? An action star? Virtual Me offers players the chance to participate in virtual versions of TV talent shows like Fame Academy and Operacion Triunfo, game shows like Deal Or No Deal and 1 vs 100 and to form real relationships with other virtual avatars on the web.

I will be writing a daily update of events at Milia a day behind with pictures but for now a glass of champagne and getting away from the cigar smoke is the order of the evening!

© Gary Hayes 2007

Jul 192006
 

Thanks to my friend Brian Seth Hurst for sending this to me and for almost single handedly changing the way Emmy Awards, for one, recognise emerging and I suppose emerged media. This article in LA times is one step on from my posts back in April about the first International Emmy Awards in Cannes – where I talked about how then, the interactive Emmys were a little slim having only four categories, it seems now things are expanding and are far more integrated and expansive…

The academy’s board of governors has approved a change in its bylaws, establishing broadband as a recognized distribution center for television along with broadcast, cable and satellite. Academy officials said this week that they haven’t worked out the details but that drama series, reality shows, sitcoms and other video programs designed specifically for websites may seek to compete in all 27 prime-time categories…This summer AOL plans to launch “Gold Rush!” as a Web-only reality program produced by Burnett. It’s also signed an agreement with Ashton Kutcher’s production company, Katalyst Films Inc., to develop five programs, each with at least 20 “webisodes.”

There are still some details to be worked out, namely should a sixty second phone episode, or a two minute webisode be able to compete with the longer form TV or even cinema versions? Perhaps so, if the experience is what it is about at the end of the day, if 20 million enjoyed the 2 minute versions more than the 45 minute episode should that be reflected. It is awards like this that will inspire producers to consider media properties appropriately for the platform rather than just see mobile and broadband as alternative delivery platforms. Brian is quoted extensively in the article, here is a comp…

“The implications, in my mind, are pretty huge,” said Brian Seth Hurst, a member of the board who has led efforts to recognize “new” media programming at the academy. “It now means that Mark Burnett’s ‘Gold Rush!’ on AOL could be entered into competition against ‘Survivor.’ We used to be the redheaded stepchildren, and now we’re a legitimate part of the business,” said Hurst, who also is chief executive of the Opportunity Management Company in Los Angeles, which helps companies develop cross-platform media strategies.

It would be nice to think that awards in the future are focused on immersion and associated entertainment value so that games and linear forms are not differentiated. What would be the categories in this world? If it becomes genre centered would and educational magazine TV programme compete with a learning event in Second Life, would a fantasy cartoon on a mobile phone compete with a sub-world in WoW or would a psychologial interactive TV show compete with a similar quiz in SimsOnline? There is an interesting road ahead as this pans out and as TV as we used to know it (mass entertainment) merges into the multi-faceted entertainment menagerie.

Posted by Gary Hayes ©2006

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