Dec 312011
 

Originally published Oct 2011 in Wired Magazine ‘Change Accelerators‘ by Gary Hayes

Image by Gary hayes

Grab some nibbles, pour yourself a drink, and sit down. You’re now ready to immerse yourself in a TV show. And then you notice that CSI Miami is placing Facebook photos of your aunt, uncle, and cousins onto the desk of a perp. Lean forward, and keep your eyes peeled, updates from your Facebook page are about to be incorporated into your favorite TV show’s narrative. (Your best friend becomes the suspect!) As you immerse yourself in the story, the story immerses itself in your social world. In this context, online meets offline and your family and friends will never look the same again!

While this opening scenario sounds like pure fantasy, it’s not. It’s actually based on Warner Brother’s Aim High, an upcoming web series that will integrate pictures, music, and information from a viewer’s Facebook page into the video. One might call it the ultimate transmedia vanity blockbuster, where viewers are watching and playing with their own distributed, but connected story fragments. If this trend continues, soon we’ll be interacting with TV and games mashed up with our own social networks on big and small screens everywhere.

Since 2003, tools that allow people to easily create, upload, and share personal content are now commonplace. With so many people sharing their lives through networks, there is a social story revolution unfolding. There are more photos taken every two minutes today than during the entire 1800s and, as my Social Media Counter shows, most of this new content is created by individuals who used to be called the audience.

Since the late ’90s, the vision of interactive TV has been to meld this viewer-generated content into shows, particularly live TV. Today, we are taking the greatest evolutionary steps in broadcasting since the advent of live TV. In my presentation, “The Gamification of Social TV,” I examine the ways audiences are becoming more and more integrated into media, such as shows, films, games, and live events; first, there is the social level, then the participative, and finally, the inclusive.

Real-time conversation about what’s happening on TV has pretty much been with us since the beginning of mass TV in the ’50s. However, nowadays we have advanced well beyond the cord-tethered telethons of yesteryear. Today, advanced technology, like text voting, allows shows to measure the sentiment of the crowd sitting at home, not just the studio audience, in real time.

Andy Warhol famously predicted, “In the future, everyone will be world-famous for 15 minutes.” That future has arrived: We can all be stars in our own lifetimes, even if it’s just among our social network. We have become our own entertainment hubs, around which our friends and media circulate. Broadcasters and service providers have caught on to this trend, and now, entertainment-based social networking websites, like GetGlue, allow viewers to check in to movies, TV, and music. These personalized hubs fueled by recommendation and loyalty are allowing viewers to lock their worlds to TV space.

Not surprisingly, marketers are also taking notice of the advantages presented by social storytelling. A recent example is the Rommy Gulla Facebook video campaign run by Panasonic Australia. To demonstrate a new Blu-ray recorder’s ability to store 28 full days of HD content, the company developed a Truman Show-esque, promotional Facebook campaign encouraging input and social sharing.

Other online services, like Hulu, are also allowing users to bring media directly to their networks and take root inside Facebook itself, creating a forum for friends to share video content seamlessly. At the other end of the spectrum, there are options like Beckinfield Mass Participation TV, which takes social media to the nth degree by inviting users to film themselves as the stars and extend the web show format. This concept borrows from the realm of social alternate reality games, such as a World Without OilTruth About Marika, or Conspiracy for Good, which have been allowing users to write themselves into scripts and become the activist hero for quite some time now. Social media storytelling has deep roots in multiplayer role-playing gaming; in fact, the fastest growing game on Facebook at the moment is Sims, the $4 billion franchise game, where players inhabit and merge with social experiences in an alternate character-driven world.

Is alternate character acting the future? The film industry is not far behind in embracing social films. Earlier this year, Toshiba, Intel, and their ad agency Pereira & O’Dell took a gamble onInside, an interactive film experiment starring Emmy Rossum directed by D.J. Caruso. Now some people are speculating about whether or not social films are the next big thing in Hollywood. Will we see a social film revolution where plot dilemmas are handed over to the audience to experience and solve?

When it is done well, traditional storytelling married to social media is very powerful: It takes those people who want to go beyond a behind-the-scenes DVD extra into the story. While we watch to see if integrated social media entertainment will really take off, there are still some issues to consider, such as, is it invasive for characters from shows to enter an individual’s social networks? and Can a TV blockbuster become too personal?

That said, for now, I’m off to watch an episode of House, where I’m the patient!

Mar 222011
 

Goodbye book stores - eBook Judas in our Midst 01

Angus & Robertson, Borders and Whitcoulls In Administration – Covered nicely by Teleread‘s “Go Bust!’

An “In Administration” notice spotted at our local Bondi Junction Borders by http://laurelpapworth.com – I decided to make it a ‘Picture word a billion digital words’ and show it in context with the culprit in the same shot. RIP ”many” big book chains 🙁 (Ironically the picture taken on a Samsung Galaxy Tablet – a nice eReader in itself!) – The book store industry unable to adapt to a hybrid model of in-store paper and electronic purchases? I for one would love to browse the paper book/mag version and then buy the eBook equivalent, selected titles only of course…

Need some statistical evidence of the reason for the decline?

  • $805 mill made from physical books in the US in Jan 11, 30% drop from same month last year Source AAP Mar 2011
  • $69.9 mill made from eBooks in Jan 11 in US a 115% increase from same month last year Source AAP Mar 2011

These stats now reflected on the ‘heritage’ tab on my Social Media Counter – ht – Serge for the heads-up on the January 2011 Association of American Publishers Report

Goodbye book stores - eBook Judas in our Midst 02

Note: I will from now on, be posting short, game changing mini-items that provide a little more context and commentary than my tweet stream – while also avoiding just reposting cool, YouTube Eye-candy 🙂 Of course still doing the long, resource style tomes!

The Count

 Posted by on September 29, 2009 at 1:02 am  Add comments
 

Click for App Store Page

Original Counter and Post from 24 Sep 2009!

August 2016  ‘Social’ Update

  • YouTube mobile videos viewed 1 billion per day Source Jul 2016
  • Photos on Instagram 95 mill daily Source Jun 16
  • Likes on Facebook 10 bill per day Source Jun 2016
  • YouTube ad revenue $4.28 bill per year Source 2015
  • Hours streamed on netflix 42.5 bill per year Source Jan 2016
  • Snapchat video views 10 bill per day Source
  • iPhones sold $150 bill per year Source 2016
  • New mobile social users 1 mill per day Source Nov 2015
  • Plus 1s on Google Plus 5 bill per day Source Nov 13
  • Money made in US from PokemonGo $1.6 mill per day Source Jul 2016
  • Messages on Facebook messenger & WhatsApp 60 bill per day Source Nov 2015
  • Likes on Instagram 4.2 bill daily Source Jun 16
  • Profiles viewed on LinkedIn 25 mill per day Source  Jan 2016
  • Photos uploaded to Facebook 400 mill per day Source Feb 2015
  • Snapchat photos shared 9000 per second Source Jan 2016
  • Google searches 100 bill per month Source 2016
  • Videos viewed on Facebook 8 bill per day Source Jan 2016
  • Users joining LinkedIn 2 per second Source Nov 2014
  • Searches on Facebook 1.5 bill per day Source Nov 2015
  • Videos watched on YouTube 5 bill per day Source Jul 2016
  • Hours uploaded to YouTube 400 hrs per minute Source Nov 2015
  • Tweets tweeted 6000 per second Source Jun 2016

June 2013 ‘Social’ Update (mobile, games & heritage to come)

  • 2.7 billion likes on Facebook daily Source May 13
  • 100 hours of video uploaded to YouTube every minute Source May 13
  • 1.5 million Android phones activated daily Source May 13
  • 13.7 billion Google searches per month  Source Mar 13
  • 350 million photos loaded to Facebook daily Source May 13
  • 2.5 billion ads served on YouTube monthly Source Mar 13
  • 4 billion Tweets sent daily Source Mar 13
  • 5 million images loaded to Instagram daily – May 13
  • 5 billion minutes spent watching online video ads monthly Source Mar 13
  • 343 million new users of Google + monthly Source Jan 13
  • $5 billion made by Facebook 2012 Source May 13
  • 833 thousand Apple iOS devices sold daily – Jan 13
  • 4 billion hours of content streamed over Netflix per quarter Source Apr 13
  • 5 million press the Google+ button daily – May 13
  • 400 million made by Twitter per year from ad revenue Source May 13
  • 250 million users login and play a Facebook game monthly Source May 13
  • 1.28 billion YouTube videos are watched monthly Source Mar 13
  • 250 million Android apps installed every month Source Mar 13
  • 656 per second likes & comments by Instagram users on Facebook Source Jan 13
  • 3.4 billion searches on Bing per month  Jan 13
  • 2.1 billion searches on Twitter per day Source May 13

June 2012 ‘Social’ Update

  • 3.2 billion likes and comments on Facebook daily Source Apr-12
  • 40 billion android and IOS apps downloaded monthly Source Mar-12
  • 2 million blogs posts written daily Source Mar-12
  • 175 million tweets sent daily Source Feb-12
  • YouTube has 2 billion plays per day Source Apr-12
  • The Google+ button is pressed 5 billion times daily Source Feb-12
  • There are 300 million photos uploaded to Facebook daily Source Apr-12
  • 294 billion emails sent per day Source Mar-12
  • Samsung sells 42.2 million smartphones each quarter Source Mar-12
  • 2.2 million pages added to StumbleUpon monthly Source Feb-12
  • Pinterest gets 17 million visits daily Source Mar-12
  • Facebook has an annual net income of $1 billion Source Feb-12
  • Daily videos uploaded to YouTube is 829 440 Source Apr-12
  • 58 photos per second uploaded via Instagram Source Mar-12
  • 66 million iPads sold annually since early 2011 Source Mar-12
  • G+ gains 625 000 more users each day Source Feb-12
  • 22 million hours of TV & Movies watched on Netflix daily Source Mar-12
  • Facebook gets 526 million users daily Source Apr-12

August 2011 Update

  • 30 billion pieces of content are shared on Facebook each month Source Jul-11
  • 550,000 Android-enabled phones are activated every day Source Jul 11
  • 48 hours of video are uploaded to YouTube every minute Source May-11
  • $2.1 billion per year are spent on Virtual Goods in the US Source May-11
  • 1 billion tweets are sent per week Source Mar-11
  • YouTube per day has over 3 billion video views Source May-11
  • There are currrently 10 billion iPhone apps downloaded each year Source Jul-11
  • 20 million people joined Google + in the first 3 weeks Source Aug-11
  • There were 80 million new FB accounts 1st quarter 2011 Source Apr-11
  • 460,000 New twitter accounts daily Source Mar-11
  • There are 50 million likes of Facebook pages per day Source May-11
  • Skype users make 300 Million Minutes of Video Calling Per Month Source Jul-11
  • Google Chrome browser webt from 10-20% of global browser share in 10 months Source Jul-11
  • There are now one million new LinkedIn members every week Source Apr-11
  • Facebook ad revenues per year now more than $4 billion Source Jan-11
  • Google + users pressing +1 over 2.5 billion times every day Source Jul-11

ABOUT Living statistics  – Many of us who have been following social media since the early 90s are very sensitive to today’s exponential growth in usage of the sharing web. Inspired by other cool real time counters, Social Media Industry Head, Laurel Papworth, my own Rise & Rise of Social Media presentations and various ‘cool’ videos (you know the ones) I decided to put together this little Flash app (which is in constant development) showing how active & dynamic the Social Web, Mobile Industry and Game Business is.

If you want to embed this on your page just click the button in the bottom left of the app to copy the code to your clipboard OR use the code/s in the boxes at the bottom of this post. Drag select it all then copy/paste into any site. Use this code as I will be regularly updating it with latest stats.

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