Nov 272013

I was invited to present a keynote, of sorts, at the Merging Media 2013 conference – a short and sweet two day conference featuring many great topics and good international speakers with a focus on the business/production side of multi platform but also the more usual esoteric aspects of transmedia and inherent community thinking. My talk was originally going to be a show and tell of all the new opportunities afforded to us by mobile, social & always-on networks, eye-candy with a chunk of futurist ‘my how the world is changing’ – but I decided to turn it more into a ‘what makes a compelling experience’ combined with ‘state of the industry (covered in my previous post)’ combined with a ‘process approach to creating service’,  talk instead – with a little of the navigating the new landscape for good measure. So waaay too much in the time allotted, but at least this article has room to breathe 🙂

I hope I give a flavour of the talk below. I believe Merging Media will be making videos available too – which I won’t be able to watch as I rushed the latter part :(. The first part was actually partly scripted so that made it easier to copy some of that below the slides but there is much much more afterwards with lots of embedded media, I think there is a flow in the post. Obviously the slides only tell a quarter of the story and embedded after the break, but first…

Hello and thanks for inviting me to keynote here in wonderful Vancouver. Being one quarter French Canadian I do feel a little affinity with some of you, and have enjoyed a little time exploring & capturing the environment in the two days prior to this conference. But moving on let me apologise. I have struggled hard to find an innovative new theme, any new jewels of wisdom for you to ponder and apply to your own projects. So much in the transmedia arena has been talked about, theorised and postulated as the journey has only just begun. Perhaps the journey through the presentation itself may throw up some nuggets?. The media and storytelling environment in still in major transition and I and nobody else really knows where we are going, all I can do is prepare myself and others for this change. But first:

An Organic Multiplatform Transmedia Experience?

This is where I live at the moment and where, I believe, I had a compelling multiplatform experience. It was about two weeks ago. It involved personal life and death decisions, it involved loved ones, friends who lost everything, physical exertion, quests and games, feeling part of and working with a community, rich information, lots of information, the authorities, the law, anxiety, stress, stories of loss and heroism and making profound choices.
Sep 252010

You shouldn’t be asking do I need a community of interest around me and my work but what will happen if I don’t have one!

Yesterday I presented twice at a great two day conference in Melbourne called ‘Arresting Audiences‘. The irony of the title not lost on this writer as the real intention of the event run by Film Victoria (a traditional film funding organisation) was commendable – finally focus on ‘users‘, ‘watchers’, ‘participants’ aka as old school ‘audiences’.

Most of the talks explored new marketing, basic demography and obligatory future trends with a couple of inspirational ‘write for your inner audience’ highlight talks from the likes of Jane ‘buffy/BSG’ Espenson, but I was asked to look at the social and transmedia aspects that affect and impact on audiences/communities so below is:

  • the embedded slideshare of my presentation
  • a little explanation
  • a trans-social-media community flow chart (used as a presentation pivot)
  • and a draft ‘in-development’ widget, which I didn’t show but which looks at reach & impressions over time (broad engagement)

Continue reading »

Mar 232007

Public Affairs Convention

I know it has been ages since I last blogged but all will be revealed shortly 😉

Here is an interesting conference, with a cool tagline, that I am speaking at in May which on the surface could sound a bit dull, “The 8th National Public Affairs Convention” but in fact has a very progressive line up of topics and speakers, so hats off to the organisers. A taster of the ‘social network’ emphasis on day one which certainly points at the acceptance now that much public activity is taking place in digital spaces, of course my area here is the 3D virtual space:

10:10am Case study: Windows Vista Launching with a bang, but the buck doesn’t stop here The Windows Vista media launch attracted 140 journalists and 50-million media mentions. How did Microsoft manage to attract so much interest in another Windows sequel? Cathy Jamieson, PR manager, Microsoft Australia

11:30am What makes a story headline the news?
A run-through of some of the year’s biggest stories, showing what attracted the media’s eye.
Patricia Kavanagh, client relations manager, Media Monitors

New media update: virtual worlds, blogs and beyond
11:50am Panel. PR opportunities knocking in virtual worlds
More than 850,000 users are spending real time and money in virtual worlds such as Second Life. But will the craze last, and how valuable will it become for PR?
Abigail Thomas, Head, Strategic Innovation & Development, new media and digital services, ABC
Gary Hayes, The Project Factory. Director, LAMP and architect of Telstra, ABC and AFTRS Second Life projects
Mark Jones, IT editor, The Australian Financial Review

1:40pm What makes Australians click? Online consumer trends
• Media habits of generations Y and X, boomers and seniors
• How widely visited are blogs and ‘virtual world’ sites?
• Where do Australians consume their news and current affairs?
Lee Hopkins, co-author, Social Media white paper

2:20pm Case study with Q&A
Now we’ve been talking a year – the corporate blog
Telstra’s “Now We Are Talking” blog has set PR tongues wagging, and the man behind Australia’s first major corporate blog will answer questions on everything from censorship to strategy.
Rod Bruem, chief editor,, Telstra

3:30pm New media panel
DIY social media: taking your message direct to the public
• MySpace and other social networking sites – PR’s forbidden fruit?
• A spinner’s guide to YouTube: who’s using it well and how?
• The ‘lessons now learnt’ rules to blogging
• Search engine optimisation PR: pulling the world to your news
Mark Helvadjian, acting head of communications, community and front doors, Yahoo!7
Nick Moraitis, online and outreach director, GetUp!
Anthony McClellan, media commentator, ABC Radio and The Australian
Darren Burden, online editorial development manager, Fairfax

To download a PDF programme click here

Posted by Gary Hayes ©2007

Apr 082006

Cannes ©Gary HayesFirstly there should have been a big award to Brian Seth Hurst for being a major part of making the International Interactive Emmy Awards happen – there have been far too many parochial, slightly sycophantic national interactive awards over the past 8 years or so. These awards, regardless of the quality of the projects, the general isolation of the ceremony (read: not integrated yet into mainstream media awards) or the relatively small scale of the event – are truly a step change. The international perspective, judges and nominees, combined with the broad scope – from individual interactive formats, pioneer awards, interactive services and channels.

The event was well organised and joyously and irreverently hosted by Desperate HousewivesÂ’ Roger Bart, who knew a thing or two about interactive services – it seemed. Mark Burnett also strutted his stuff as a presenter. I was sat next to a great ambassador of interactive futures, Dr. Simone Emmelius – manager of ZDF Vision, one of GermanyÂ’s two public service broadcasters and it was great catching up with her. Also an old BBC colleague Nic Cohen (BBCÂ’s 24/7 commissioner) and soon to be LAMP mentor and all round web 2.0 pioneer David Jensen shared our table – which we quickly found out to be the Interactive Programme Judges table. Without giving too much away 😉 my scores were well placed and the user driven, organic ‘CultÂ’ show took the premier award. Their table was next to ours and it exploded in true jubilant French fashion at the announcement. Both Sky and BBC were placed in a couple of categories but we, the judges were I believe looking for services more forward looking and audience embracing – both Sky and BBC entries have been pushing similar formats for a good three or four years. The other two awards went to Hello D (S. Korea) for interactive service and the granddaddy of Broadband TV, Video Networks (London) for Interactive Channel – well done to Roger Lynch for that.

I do not think it is who wins the first few years of a new International Award, but that it becomes recognised as the one to get and it keeps going from strength to strength. Again thanks to the International Academy of Television Arts & Sciences – there are many minor awards around the world for so-called innovative services, but as progressive media becomes mass audience and mainstream the enormous effort in reaching tens of millions rather than hundreds should be congratulated. I am sure the BBC and others will win with more innovative services in the coming years, a Jamie Kane with major TV component for instance would have gone down well. Perhaps Gold Rush will be there next year – Mark Burnett was here as I said presenting the Pioneer Prize to his mate Jonathan Millar (CEO of AOL), well deserved because as we know (and were told on at least 20 occasions) that Live8 has changed the landscape of TV, the internet and mass entertainment.

The three categories strongly suggest that it should snugly fit into the larger TV EmmyÂ’s. I also think that there could be several other categories – for example Interactive Programme could cover everything from participatory and user generated TV through to game, documentary, news and sport genre – but there is always next year!
Posted by Gary Hayes ©2006