Jan 012012
 

Originally published Oct 2011 in Wired Magazine ‘Change Accelerators‘ by Gary Hayes 4 of 5

Image by Gary Hayes

When planning your next holiday to London with the fam, don’t forget to sync up your iGlasses and load up the London experience packs. On arrival, slip on your augmented reality sunglasses and take a look around: Roman-era London appears before your eyes. Slaves and gladiators walk through the streets and chariots rush past. You can add your own comments leaving virtual “We Were Here” graffiti for all time. The experience is part documentary, part user-generated narrative, and entirely pervasive. In other words, augmented reality meets living history.

In our everyday lives, we engage with stories in many ways, whether it’s eye-to-eye contact with a stranger that sparks an instant connection or a well-crafted movie or TV show. But what if we started experiencing those stories in the outernet’s layers?

While online networks are evolving traditional entertainment, such as TV and web series, we are also witnessing the rise of a new form of media called “augmented reality storytelling.” I’ve dubbed this new form of diversion ’ntertainment, as a shorthand for immersive augmented reality entertainment.

At its broadest level, augmented reality is about enhancing the physical world through digital elements, such as images, sound, and information. Now technology is enabling us to further situate and layer our digital stories in places where other narratives can’t reach. Right now, we see this happening when someone holds up a camera on an iPhone or tablet and shares objects or stories from the real world.

The opening Roman London example is based on an existing service called Londinium, which is a collaboration between the History Channel and the Museum of London using augmented reality video layered over real-world streets to re-create an alternate history. Coincidentally, London is also used as a site in the globe-spanning Ghost Tours 2.0. Haunted London encourages visitors to explore the city’s eerie side using locative AR (augmented reality). Likewise, another situated project is Witness, which draws participants into the dramatic and seedy underbelly of criminal Berlin. In this case, players are the hero: They watch graphic video scenes at different city locations and are then sent detective challenges to uncover the truth. But here’s the twist: The story might just bite you back! Augmented reality games and stories can even get physical, like the recent example of Chelsea FC playing the world’s largest Space Invaders game in a stadium using projection AR.

Gaming is leading the way. New consoles, like Vita, allow users to literally take game characters orreality fighters into the streets. Other gaming advances like AR games on Nintendo’s 3DS start to recognize place markers placed around a player’s city, transforming screen-based MMORPG(massively multiplayer online role-playing games) into an LMMOG (location-based massively multiplayer online games).

Augmented reality storytelling is starting to appear across our smart GPS mobile devices. Several marketing campaigns are taking the initiative by spearheading real-time AR challenges, such as Vodafone’s Buffer Monsters, which challenged German smartphone users to download a mobile app to capture virtual creatures and win a lifetime plan. This is only one example, other AR advergames encourage users to competitively run around cities on scavenger hunts for real-world prizes, such as the Droid Bionic AR Game. Similarly, this October, Gundam, the Japanese anime giant, release an iPhone/iPad app called Gundam Area Wars. The game uses the devices’ camera and gyroscopic sensors to show life-size 3D models situated in the player’s real-world landscape.

Given these above examples, I return to my earlier travel scenario and I wonder how commonplace it will become for people arriving in a new location to start experiencing it through augmented reality storytelling and gameplay? The traditional guidebook has already morphed into digital form. The Lonely Planet is already a downloadable app. Is it a big jump to imagine AR and location-based storytelling won’t soon allow travelers to engage history on a whole new level? One might even argue a deeper and more meaningful one than just the 2D sightseeing experience of looking at crumbling ruins. So many guidebooks have been written on the principle of making history come to life—AR actually makes it possible.

One could even take this one step further and question, why do we need to travel at all when we have our own personal Holodecks at our fingertips? Fast Company recently reported on Tour Wrist, a virtual tour that lets iPad users move around a global location with unlimited zoom and freedom. “Travelers” are virtually transported to that place and able to immerse themselves in it becoming the hero in a remotely situated, digital storyworld.

Finally, in the near future, we might all have the capability to create duplicates of our surroundings in 3D for others. This Microsoft R&D initiative to map the world uses the fastest selling piece of tech on the planet, the Xbox Kinect. This would allow everyday people to create unlimited user-generated 3D AR—foreseeable as easily as snapping a digital picture. In addition to this, there is a saturation of location-stamped social stories inside services, such as Google Earth, TagWhat, HistoryPin, Facebook Places, CheckIn+, Foursquare, and Gowalla, among others. What will result from all these stories becoming interconnected and navigable using AR devices?

From that point on, we will be co-creating an augmented entertainment eternity. Together. Will you be a part of it?

Jul 272011
 

OK not really a Dummies guide as there are some complex elements in here,  but one has to use whatever memes are in vogue 🙂 A few weeks ago I was commissioned by Screen Australia to write a very basic structure & guide for producers relatively new to multi platform content to structure & document their propositions, after they have developed the ‘audience centric’ concepts. This has just been published on the Screen Australia site as a digital resource for those needing to document projects for transmedia productions.

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Mar 252011
 

I have been trying to find a really simple metaphor for clients, students and other industry professionals to help them better understand the complex world of multi-platform. Also completing the last few chapters of my Networked Media Storytelling book I needed a big but simple metaphor. One of the biggest issues I have faced over the years is rooted in the question “I tell stories on one or two platforms why do I need to reach out onto other platforms and how?”. I often reply with a long answer that falls into a few categories (1) Audience have fragmented 2) Business models have shifted (3) Engagement and social needs have altered (4) Have you noticed a general decline in traditional media? (5) Your stories can be improved exponentially if you ‘transmediarize’ them etc: I obviously leave the more fundamental ‘how to’s” to my consultations or workshops and a key element of that is what are the new platforms combined with how to design your story appropriately for them.

So for a few workshops & talks recently I developed a simple ‘graphic’ which demystifies some of the challenges storytellers face. This post describes the motivation and deeper thinking behind the World Map of Multi-Platform Cultures & Transmedia Rituals. How to understand this new world and how to navigate the relatively uncharted waters?

Ye Olde Days – The Disconnected World of Gated Platform

Around 40 years ago the opportunities for storytellers were both limited and segregated. By that I mean it was hard to truly make your media work across multiple distribution channels, sure you could do the whole film of the whole book or the whole radio play of the whole comic but the concept of placing ‘isolated’ narrative elements of your story appropriately designed for each and meant to ‘move’ users between them was a pretty alien concept. The more sophisticated story form within multi-platform (transmedia) was also hard to achieve due to the commercial gate holders on each platform wanting the ‘self-contained’ whole – not bits and pieces that also promoted competitors or drove traffic away.

World of Multi-Platform in 1970s

But as we all know between 1990 and the present broadband internet, social media and mobile technology changed the landscape in a not so subtle way and old school media creative thinking is not relevant anymore in this altered landscape.

The New World Dis-Order of Multi-Platform Experiences

Wow how things have changed. Like our physical planet mass media and its internal cultures has splintered, the land masses moved apart leaving a complex environment to navigate.

World Map of Multi-Platform Cultures & Transmedia Rituals

Firstly we have the large continents of

  • The Sea of 2D Media – Video, audio, images and includes the Bay of Social Media
  • The Ocean of 3D Games – Social Worlds, Console single players, MMOGs, Serious, Casual
  • The Lands of Physicality – Theme Parks, Outdoor Screens, Urban Spaces etc: and includes the Bay of Mobiles

Looking more closely at my map, consider the hybrid media ‘waters’ that separate the lands. Between Games and Physical Lands/Mobile we find the ‘Straits of Augmented Reality’ – meshing the digital and the real.

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Jan 172011
 

Social media is a humbling experience much of the time. For one it is a super fast barometer of many aspects of our digital persona made up partly of a) our online influence, b) what people ‘feel’ about you (sentiment) and c) who we are connected too but more recently with the introduction of Twitter Lists we now have an element of ‘labelling’ aka ‘tagging’. Like most I am not keen on being pigeon holed, filed and rubber stamped as ‘this kind’ of person or someone who only ‘thinks/creates/is involved’ in those things, but I was fascinated this morning in doing what Laurel Papworth did some months ago, looking at how others saw me based only on my Twitter activity.

I have currently been added to 700 lists (which I think is up in the top 10% or so?) –

the key of course is that these lists are created un-prompted by those they follow, they have selected ‘you’ quietly in the background to be a part of a personal filter, carefully structured by users who want a way to distill the vastness of a 140 character universe of noise, that is twitter – making lists for themselves of a few key personal influencers through to hundreds of sharing tweeters across several lists on quite broad topics, the lists themselves followed by thousands.

There were over 6.5 million twitter lists at the start of 2010 so I suspect at least double that for 2011 according to TNW and there are hundreds of tList directories on the web now such as ListAtlas that focuses on the most popular lists such as 22 000 following the @bieberarmy :: justinfollowplease list of 91 fans who “want to be followed” by JB himself or  38 verified world leaders compiled into this list @verified :: World Leaders followed by 15 000 or so. But back to my own little world…I am not sure if the lists below represent ‘who I am’, especially as 75% of my twitter activity is sharing links, but they certainly represent areas I work in and am interested by.

… without further ado – I quickly used TextWrangler to pull out key words and broke the 700 lists (I am on) into smaller ‘categorised’ batches. This serves as a one stop shop for me to dip in and out and decide which lists I will follow and for you to possibly find ones you may find of interest.

What do your lists say about you?

TRANSMEDIA

  1. http://twitter.com/tlists/transmedia-995 The most listed Tweeters on 37 lists about Transmedia
  2. http://twitter.com/#!/aliciakan/transmediatweeps Teaching me a little bit more about transmedia, everyday
  3. http://twitter.com/#!/annabelroux/transmedia
  4. http://twitter.com/#!/matthanson/screen-bleed Media theories & futures in a multiplatform world.
  5. http://twitter.com/#!/brand_candy/transmedia-storytelling People interested in transmedia storytelling
  6. http://twitter.com/#!/bulldogmi/isthistransmedia A list of crossmedia, transmedia and storytelling tweets
  7. http://twitter.com/#!/Ch_Larue/transmedia
  8. http://twitter.com/#!/daniele_ferrari/crossmedia-transmedia
  9. http://twitter.com/#!/DilemmaLA/transmedia
  10. http://twitter.com/#!/eceilhan/transmedia
  11. http://twitter.com/#!/FilmThreat/transmedia-artists A self-updating filtered list of people I follow (generated by http://twitter.com/#!/formulists)
  12. http://twitter.com/#!/FLB_AlainThys/media-innovation tweets about media innovation, crossmedia, transmedia and other interesting media developments
  13. http://twitter.com/#!/frank_tentler/transmedia-avangard List of Transmedia and Transmedia Storytelling Avangard on Twitter
  14. http://twitter.com/#!/geoffreylong/transmedia Scholars and practitioners in transmedia.
  15. http://twitter.com/#!/helloflow/worldoftransmedia all people you want to follow on transmedia storytelling!
  16. http://twitter.com/#!/ivanovitch/transmedia People working in, interested in, thinking about Transmedia.
  17. http://twitter.com/#!/jlsimons/transmedia TM
  18. http://twitter.com/#!/KH_enthu_Ziasm/transmedia well, are you transmedia ready ?
  19. http://twitter.com/#!/melaniemcbride/gaming-transmedia-10 Makers, observers, researchers and players of games/transmedia.
  20. http://twitter.com/#!/nouners/transmedia
  21. http://twitter.com/#!/nwangpr/transmedia This list follows those who are exploring new storytelling opportunities for brands and agencies.
  22. http://twitter.com/#!/nyuji/transmedia
  23. http://twitter.com/#!/onceuponaword/transmedia A list of people who regularly tweet smart things on transmedia
  24. http://twitter.com/#!/pascalmory/transmedia
  25. http://twitter.com/#!/paulalexgray/transmedia
  26. http://twitter.com/#!/Pixel8studio/transmedia Stories to be told.
  27. http://twitter.com/#!/pseudonymDK/transmedia Important people to follow to learn more about transmedia
  28. http://twitter.com/#!/Sarn/transmedia-2
  29. http://twitter.com/#!/tactica/transmedia
  30. http://twitter.com/#!/TedHope/transmedia
  31. http://twitter.com/#!/WebVideoMedia/transmedia-storytelling
  32. http://twitter.com/#!/nativeshell/trans-incidental Transmedia news and peeps

NEWER MEDIA

  1. http://twitter.com/#!/thatgreg/new-media-2 People actively changing the way media is created and ultimately consumed.
  2. http://twitter.com/#!/chicklitgurrl/new-media-9
  3. http://twitter.com/#!/ftiwa/new-media
  4. http://twitter.com/#!/iamlowetion/new-media
  5. http://twitter.com/#!/Morgan_Flood/new-media
  6. http://twitter.com/#!/pascalroeyen/new-media
  7. http://twitter.com/#!/RichGarner/new-media

AUGMENTED REALITY

  1. http://twitter.com/#!/AaronMarshall/augmented-reality Cool folks tweeting interesting things about Augmented Reality.
  2. http://twitter.com/#!/ayaLAN/augmented-reality
  3. http://twitter.com/#!/Balubab/augmented-reality Augmented Reality universe
  4. http://twitter.com/#!/bobbyverlaan/augmented-reality
  5. http://twitter.com/#!/BrianSe7en/augmented-reality
  6. http://twitter.com/#!/chrisgrayson/augmented-reality-peeps People & Companies involved in Augmented Reality, as well as AR Blogs
  7. http://twitter.com/#!/claudiochea/augmented-reality-ar
  8. http://twitter.com/#!/fbeeper/augmented-reality
  9. http://twitter.com/#!/Franck_Briand/augmented-reality
  10. http://twitter.com/#!/jamesalliban/augmented-reality
  11. http://twitter.com/#!/renatefischer/ar
  12. http://twitter.com/#!/konterkariert/augmented-reality
  13. http://twitter.com/#!/mikeyjhay/augmented-reality
  14. http://twitter.com/#!/RWW/augmented-reality
  15. http://twitter.com/#!/eduardovalencia/augmentedreality
  16. http://twitter.com/#!/tomyun/ar
  17. http://twitter.com/#!/GaryPHayes/alternate-augmented
  18. http://twitter.com/#!/siyann/immersive virtual worlds, augmented reality, immersive experiences
  19. http://twitter.com/#!/dromescu/ar Augmented Reality
  20. http://twitter.com/#!/jlapoutre/mobile-ar Mobile Augmented Reality

INTERESTING, THOUGHT LEADER & MINDS

  1. http://twitter.com/#!/_Antonella_/ar-thoughtleaders
  2. http://twitter.com/#!/9dimension/brightside bright ppl
  3. http://twitter.com/#!/owlark/interesting-people-a1 Great people: listed or interested
  4. http://twitter.com/#!/InShot/thought-leadership James Grant Hay’s Thinking Out Aloud
  5. http://twitter.com/#!/7seashell/interesting-people
  6. http://twitter.com/#!/torridluna/minds
  7. http://twitter.com/#!/BlessTheTeacher/interesting-people
  8. http://twitter.com/#!/CelticWitch99/no-idea-but-interesting
  9. http://twitter.com/#!/holla_tweet/interesting-ppl
  10. http://twitter.com/#!/LMurphy140/from-far-far-away non local interesting
  11. http://twitter.com/#!/ManuCedat/interesting-people
  12. http://twitter.com/#!/Marcey_H/interesting-people
  13. http://twitter.com/#!/MikeFreyParadux/bloggers Bloggers! Check these wonderful blogs by interesting tweeps.
  14. http://twitter.com/#!/OwenKelly/people a miscellaneous assortment of interesting people
  15. http://twitter.com/#!/paolonieddu/insight-and-cool-shit Links to interesting stuff
  16. http://twitter.com/#!/robbnotes/interesting
  17. http://twitter.com/#!/sonjagottschalk/interesting
  18. http://twitter.com/#!/WayneNH/interesting-watch

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