Jul 162008
 

Interesting. I have a screen here at work spiting out various random on the spot blog posts from the Future of Media Summit . Looking at the themes and points coming out forcibly takes me back to the mid to late 90s and even earlier. At today’s conference there is lots of discussion about how media is fragmenting, democratization of distribution, how personalization (your personal media cloud) is really where it’s at, the live web and a plethora of points about how video on the web has erm, generated a new advertising model. Yawn. Now I remember why I avoid ‘Future of…” conferences…

Seems all I have read from the Future Exploration Networks innovative and ground breaking (video link up – really, a video conference link…I did one of those in 96?!) between Sydney and San Francisco are not really exploring the future but each others guess as to what is really happening at the moment – cause no one really has a clue. It is deja vu, a recap of many European/Far East versions of the future from 10-15 years ago. In fact looking at most of my presentations and posts from years ago on this and other blogs cover most of the points, especially about personalised media (oh yes thats the title). For example Ross Dawson’s‚ future of media topics I covered in presentations circa 1999 – a few recents are in my slideshare group which I rarely promote or on this PDF page which has some earlier ones and notably in this fun view of 2009 I did in Perth back in 2000 (compare the two). First here is oft self-promoted Ross Dawson’s vision of what is shaping the Future of Media…

Ross Dawson 2008

Media and entertainment industries growing massively. Seven driving forces shaping media

  1. Increasing media consumption – ‘we want to swim in an ocean of media all the time’
  2. Fragmentation – proliferation of new channels (mobile, video, etc)
  3. Participation – people sharing their stories
  4. Personalisation – of content & advertising, issues with privacy
  5. New revenue models – advertising networks
  6. Generational change – younger people becoming dominant in marketplace
  7. Increasing bandwidth – shifting what is currently being delivered over other channels > iPhone mania

Personal Cloud – content we own and create – From this rains down the ‘precipitation of participation’ – sharing our photos, stories and lives with others – To what extent do we control our Personal Cloud?

Yes these are and have been shaping the future of media for the past 15 years at least – and then 2) my slightly cheeky predictions…drum roll…Future of Media in 2009 (from 2000’s Small Screen Big Picture)

Gary Hayes 2000

The World in 2009

  • Every individual can become a producer of content which is available to everyone else – if they want it.
  • Now anything is available on demand from anywhere over vast broadband networks.
  • Everything is ‘pulled’, only personally relevant content is ‘pushed’.
  • Everything can be made portable & kept forever
  • The home becomes a personalised entertainment and life system where everything is centralised – games, video, shops, audio, text, email & vmail & banking.
  • CD collections, home movies, personal photographs are stored here too
  • ‘Open Standards’ killed off all proprietary platforms in 2005 and the large ‘trusted’ traditional broadcasters collaborated and produced one navigation system that all companies adopted
  • All ‘content programme brands’ have elements in all of the above
  • The words ‘TV’ ‘radio’ & ‘internet’ disappeared from our vocabulary. Even the word ‘interactive’ went – everything is now interactive
  • The World Wide Web of early 2000 is regarded as a ‘low resolution’ pilot
  • Scheduled ‘live video’ becomes a special group shared event – there is only one broadcast channel in each country – these events generate most online discussion
  • True to all predictions the ‘interactive’ fridge becomes the most popular, connected device in the house

OK as with all “Future of Media” conferences we come to expect lots of waffle, fluffy guesses as to where Social Media or New Gadgets (iPhone, yawn) will really take us. Most talks I did for TV-Anytime and BBC around 2000-2003 covers most of the discussion around future of privacy, targeted ads and personal content systems. But bottom line it really it is about paranoia on the part of traditional media makers able to afford turning to high fee ‘futurist’ consultants who rarely produce anything apart from a ‘compelling’ stage presence and a book or two to sell. OK I am possibly being cruel but if the content industry is going to grow up it should stop looking for shiny jewels from crystal ball gazing, web trawling, big picture, space cadets and look to hands-on strategists who live and breathe this stuff. Most of the former are jumping on any myth/hype they can use to leverage interest in their ‘expertise’ but it is rarely about the future and often about regurgitating the past within the boundaries of this fresh new high bandwidth, on-demand, two way network. I have talked long and hard in the past about the separation between commentators and producers around cross-media and I have also pointed out academia needs to up its game. I don’t bother to win friends, as you can tell.

Unlike several folk at the Future of Media conference I rarely self-promote as being worthy of title of visionary (and any one up pens their own websites with those words in the title should be seriously steered clear of). But to be like them I thought I would throw in a bunch of my own quotes I normally pull out for wall stickers on LAMP courses: (Some others here)

“If you are not passionate about the empowerment potential of your interactive creation or find something new in it yourself at every turn, you should not call yourself an interactive producer” Gary Hayes 2005

“True interactivity should require users to give something of themselves and for the ‘system’ to resonate with that. If all you ask them to put in is selecting a series of vacuous pre-built options, their engagement is minimal and all they will truly get out is a series of vacuous outcomes.” Gary Hayes 2005

“Over a 15 year, medium term broadband future terms such as Film, TV, Radio & the Internet will start to disappear from our next generation’s vocabulary. Audiences will interactively share & access video, audio and games across a sea of devices, partly oblivious of appointment-to-view in the 20th Century.” Gary Hayes – Snr Producer, BBC. 2000

“The ‘My Media Generation’ are experienced multitaskers. They are used to browsing, jumping between devices and physical locations. Services that do not integrate this in to the design will be lost in the noise. One must create story that permeates their world, playing with the fact that they are already enjoying self-induced, parallel experiences.” Gary Hayes 2005

“The future may be cross-media but it is also interactive multi-modal devices at home and on the move that connect to every source and every media type” Gary Hayes 2005

“Just as humans eventually were unable to tame the complexity and scale of the physical universe so it will be with our media universe. The only course of action will be to send personalised intelligent agents, reconnaissance drones, deep into the content cosmos to capture relevance. The personalized future will be a world where rich audio visual and game media orbits around the digital you – occasionally being sucked into your ‘realm’ like stars pulled by forces unknown into black holes” Gary Hayes, Space Cadet 2004

We are all guilty of Weasel Words when we are asked the ‘where is it all heading question’ but there are others who base their careers on them. Typical ones heard in many a consultation session, “Social Media has enormous implications, it will change the business forever” or how about “Video on the web will produce a sea change of advertising models” or “These social virtual browser based web worlds could be very important for your brand” – client: yes we guessed that, but please tell us how it will in detail, what we need to do to change, in detail and by the way, have you ‘lived’ our business.

But lets make this post interactive, which one are you hands-on strategist or space cadet weasel word waffler?

 

Mar 202008
 

I don’t often do the press release thing but given this is a great metaverse platform company from my neck of the woods (Melbourne and Brisbane – Australia) and this is beyond the vapourware we have seen from other players hoping to topple Linden and Second Life off their perch, I will make an exception. The key thing here is the marrying of a distributed Virtual World network (NICTA) with a very accessible, promising client I have been trying out (Vastpark). Things do look on track for end of 2008 which is not as bullish as predecessors, but still it will be 2009/10 before there is a significant community to rival Second Life who of course have their own distributed server plans. Anyway over to the PR release.

Vastpark

VastPark licences NICTA’s Distributed Network Engine technology

(20 March 2008) NICTA, Australia’s Information and Communications Technology (ICT) Research Centre of Excellence, has signed a commercial license agreement with VastPark, a leading virtual worlds platform provider.

Researchers at NICTA have developed a decentralised network engine for virtual worlds that can scale to millions of users, thereby enabling creators to develop and deploy online games and virtual worlds more efficiently and cost effectively.

Massively multiplayer online (MMO) applications, such as large multiplayer games and on-line virtual worlds, have attracted an enormous user population on the Internet. In fact, thousands of users can be on-line simultaneously in the same virtual world. This creates a significant challenge for the creators of virtual worlds.

The traditional client-server approach does not scale affordably as server capacity needs to be upgraded to meet the anticipated demand for a service; rich media content requires the underlying network to be upgraded to handle the expected network traffic; and central servers are a single point of failure and require constant maintenance.

“This is great for VastPark as we want to make it easier for anyone to create and deploy their own virtual worlds and games without the headache of centralised server infrastructure. We also want to provide a unique user experience on our platform: we want users to know they can turn up at a location and no matter how many people are there, they should be able to see their friends rather than find out they’ve been stuck on separate servers as often happens in games today,” said Bruce Joy, CEO of VastPark.

Craig Presti, Lead Developer of VastPark said: “If we want virtual worlds to become a standard way of interacting online then we want to enable a better user experience. What’s great about NICTA’s Distributed Network Engine is how well it integrates with the VastPark platform and that it allows VastPark be the first to solve some of the elusive problems for virtual worlds platforms such as how to make them extremely economic to run and how to handle the “flash mob” problem (where suddenly a massive crowd appears on one world). This really makes the VastPark solution a complete and elegant system.”

NICTA’s agreement with VastPark will provide VastPark with access to the Distributed Network Engine and the team behind it. The agreement also provides the NICTA team with a commercial platform to conduct a large-scale trial, and a commercialisation path with VastPark as an industry collaborator.

“NICTA’s technology will reduce the cost of maintaining expensive game servers by delegating data processing to individual participants,” NICTA P2P project leader Dr Santosh Kulkarni said. “This will also improve resilience to failures by removing the single point of failure and reduce game traffic in the core network, improving system performance.”

“VastPark has a mature platform that has received excellent reviews from the industry pundits,” he added. “When you combine such a platform with cutting edge technology from NICTA, it has the potential to shake the virtual world space.”

“This is the beginning of what we expect to be a long-term relationship with VastPark as a partner in the development and commercialisation of the virtual world technology coming out of NICTA,” Dr Kulkarni said.

VastPark’s CEO, Bruce Joy said: “VastPark is about making virtual worlds useful and convenient to create and deliver and NICTA’s technology helps extend VastPark by allowing thousands of simultaneous users to meet each other without creators needing to pre-invest in expensive infrastructure. This is potentially revolutionary stuff.”

“This engine will complement our existing VastServer network engine that is designed using a traditional client server architecture. NICTA’s engine will mean that we can offer our world creators a level of low-cost scalability that is just not achievable otherwise. I can’t wait to see the impact this has on the market when it is released,” adds Joy.

“I am delighted that NICTA is entering into this agreement with VastPark,” NICTA Victoria Research Laboratory Director Professor Rob Evans said.

The new networking technology is now being integrated into VastPark and there will be an announcement later this year about when the beta testing will commence. Testing is expected to begin towards the end of 2008.

About VastPark
VastPark is a virtual worlds platform supporting an ecosystem of creators, consumers and user generated worlds. Built on five years of research and development and focussed on effective open standards, VastPark features free tools that enable users to create and publish 3D virtual worlds quickly and easily. Communities can create and monetize their own highly interactive worlds and empower their users creativity.

About NICTA
National ICT Australia Limited (NICTA) is a national research institute with a charter to build Australia’s pre-eminent Centre of Excellence for information and communications technology (ICT). NICTA is building capabilities in ICT research, research training and commercialization in the ICT sector for the generation of national benefit.

National ICT Australia is funded by the Australian Government as represented by the Department of Broadband, Communications and the Digital Economy and the Australian Research Council through the ICT Centre of Excellence program.

NICTA was established and is supported by its members: The Australian Capital Territory Government; The Australian National University; NSW Department of State and Regional Development; and The University of New South Wales. NICTA is also supported by its partners: the University of Sydney; University of Melbourne; the Victorian Government; the Queensland Government; Griffith University; Queensland University of Technology; and The University of Queensland.

For further information:
Liz Chung
Marketing manager,
VastPark
press@vastpark.com

Feb 132008
 

If you are anything like me you probably have many blogs on the go. I stupidly set myself the task of maintaining the following blogs, wikis and a few web 1.0 sites:

LAMP, JustVirtual, Watercooler, GaryHayes.tv, Cubrisound, LAMP Wiki, MUVEDesign and a host of sharing portal channels, other wikis, forums and commercial sites which you can see on my Wikipedia profile.

Anyway I often find posts that could sit on more than one site and for some bizarre reason I have refrained from cross-posting. High standards? Making multiple blogs redundant, who knows. So there will be a quick burst of recent posts from other sites, which have a slightly different editorial stance – but will at least reduce the dreaded ‘blog-guilt’. And to part two of this brief, superficial post, I hearby claim for the world a new ‘conjugative (adj.)’ word

Definition

BLOGUILT n. 1. A feeling of inadequacy and self-reproach that comes from being time poor and not posting regularly to one or more blogs 2. Remorseful awareness of having done something wrong by not posting 3. Sinful feelings due to posting something weak and inferior due to the fact that you just should post something because it has been a while since the last one.

About Gary

 Posted by on April 27, 2007 at 5:13 am  Add comments
 

Garys Full Wikipedia Profile Link.

Short Bio

Mr Gary Hayes – Founding Director Storylabs.us  and CEO MUVEDesign.com

Gary is an award winning multi-platform producer, author, educator and Director. He was recently Senior Producer and Manager of Product Development at ABC TV Multi Platform responsible for delivering new editorial formats against ABC TV shows including dual screen, social TV, games and mobile. He founded the global training group StoryLabs.us in 2010 (previously founding and running innovation lab LAMP from 2005-10) growing innovative multi-platform, game, virtual world and transmedia productions. He is also currently CEO of Augmented & Virtual Reality company MUVEDesign.com (multi user virtual environments) and creating branded & story based multi platform for major brands. Gary was previously Senior Development Producer and Manager at the BBC in UK for 8 years – delivering interactive Social TV, broadband internet and emerging platforms to millions of UK users. After 2 years in the US as interactive producer Gary then became the founding director in Australia of the Innovation Training Unit LAMP.edu.au via AFTRS between 2005-10. He recently became a Distinguished Talent permanent resident in Australia and since 2005 runs the top ten AdAge Power150 Media & Marketing blog covering personalized pervasive entertainment, personalizemedia.com. Gary designed & lectured full time multiplatform courses at MetroScreen and AFTRS and adjudicates on Virtual Reality and Multiplatform for several Government Screen funding organisations and has been an award juror for many years including the International Interactive Emmy’s and recently Banff Media.

extended bio

Mr Gary Hayes – Director MUVEDesign.com & Founder Storylabs.us

After many years working in the UK’s Music and Multimedia industry Gary joined the BBC in London as a multimedia editor and quickly became a Senior Development Producer then Manager and leading thinker in the BBC’s development of the internet, interactive TV and emerging platforms from 95-04. He devised & produced many of the BBC’s ‘firsts’ – Digital Text, the first broadcast interactive TV service – ‘Nomad’ the first live internet documentary – ‘X-Creatures’ the first broadband TV service and even introduced the first video and audio onto the BBC’s internet sites in 1996. Gary produced and devised over 20 other eTV and broadband TV services including Top of the Pops, Travel Show, State Apart and several future BBC cross-platform navigators. He also conceived with the linear show producers award winning iTV projects such as Antiques Roadshow, Walking with Beasts & various BBC iTV game formats. Gary created numerous courses and seminars on Interactive thinking for linear producers, was active in the Blue Sky Imagineering and R&D depts looking at personal TV and virtual spaces and was a leading part of BBC strategy teams from 2001 in preparing for on-demand, cross-platform services.

Living & consulting in the US during 2004-5 he line produced Showtime’s PVR enhanced L-Word, as part of AFI digital labs and devised a range of new on-demand program formats for two national TV networks. Gary also produced & chaired conferences around LA including Hollywood industry panel seminars and Digital Days both looking at emerging media super-distribution models. He also chaired the Business Models Group from 99-03 for TV-Anytime (the lead media-on-demand standards body) and co-authored a Department Trade and Industry Report on Personal Video Systems. He has been an International Interactive Emmy juror for the past three years.

Between 2005 -10  Gary was the Director the Australian Laboratory for Advanced Media Production run through AFTRS (Australian Film TV and Radio School) and based in Sydney and was probably Australia’s premier emerging media R&D and production labs. It combined seminars, workshops, immersive rapid prototyping residentials and industry focused product development. Through AFTRS he also ran workshops in multi user virtual environments (MUVE) for cinematographers, designers, script writers and directors exploring the potential of shared social online virtual spaces for collaborative production, creativity and education.

From a commercial perspective Gary is CCO and Head of Virtual Worlds with MUVEDesign (and previously the Sydney based Project Factory respectively) pioneering alternate, augmented & virtual world creation and immersive & organic story experiences for TV/Film, Education, Business & Performance. MUVEDesign are currently building and devising commercial and game-like services in Transmedia, Augmented Reality and also virtual worlds, having recently produced and built major Second Life Australian presences including Telstra, ABC, MultiMedia Victoria Laneways, Deakin University, AFTRS, Thursday’s Fictions & other Fortune 100 companies in Second Life. He runs a fictional MUVE blog JustVirtual and a renowned top 10 Australian Media and Marketing blog on media personalisation, digital brands, new media forms and creativity at www.personalizemedia.com and has presented at over 450 conferences on subjects ranging from Transmedia, Augmented Reality business, Advanced and Interactive TV, Personalization, Brands and Education in Virtual Worlds, Media Futures and Interactive Art and Music amoungst others. As a published music producer, composer and performer he has had over 200 works performed live and on TV/Film and Radio.

Contact

Take your pick from any of these emails:

  • gary @ personalizemedia.com
  • gary @ muvedesign.com
  • gary @ storylabs.us
  • mail @ garyhayes.tv
  • gary @ korkyt.net
  • gary @ justvirtual.com

Garys web universe

  • www.PersonalizeMedia.com – Gary’s main media blog. Started mid 2005
  • www.StoryLabs.us – Gary is the main founder of this global, multi platform storytelling development initiative
  • www.MUVEDesign.com – His company designing and producing Transmedia, Augmented Reality and Virtual Worlds. Started mid 2007
  • garyphayes.com – A comprehensive hub site, partly devoted to composed music and other personal creativity
  • www.Korkyt.net – Currently Gary’s Filmic Composer Site. (originally homepage/blog format started mid 1995)
  • www.GaryHayes.TV – Focus on Advanced TV blog. Started beginning 2004
  • www.JustVirtual.com – POV as Gary Hazlitt in Second Life. Started early 2006
  • www.LAMP.edu.au – The Australian leading Social & Cross Media Development Lab directed by Gary. Started mid 2005 ended 2010
  • www.TheProjectFactory.com – Gary was Head of Virtual Worlds, most video content on the site still his work. Started 2007.
  • The BBC Musical Nomad – a reconstructed blog site from a live webumentary project (live satellite blogging from Central Asia in 1997) originally at bbc.co.uk/nomad from 1997 – 2008.

Other sites & social media:

Gary’s Web 2.0/3.0 and Social Networks

Selection of wikipedia and wiki cited blog based articles (up to April 07). E.g.:

2 pages