Tail wags the dog…

 Posted by on February 15, 2006 at 5:20 pm  Personal Media  No Responses »
Feb 152006

or mobile media promotes its TV big brother. As iTunes and other mobile media portals take hold it comes as a surprise that the media is surprised about an effect which seems rather obvious – those who watch iPod video TV shows switch on to their TV equivalents. The report out today from TV week about the dreadful US remake of the brilliant Gervais UK office points out that the popularity of the mobile download is pulling audiences back or for the first time to the TV show.

Then on Jan. 5, the prime-time series moved to Thursday nights and delivered a 4.5 in adults 18 to 49, then its highest rating ever for a regular slotted telecast, which was bested last week with a 5.1 in the demo. Also on Jan. 5, it served up its best retention ever of its lead-in, “My Name Is Earl,” capturing 87 percent of that show’s audience, up from its previous 71 percent average. On Jan. 12 it retained 86 percent of its lead-in. And the ratings bump can’t be attributed to a change in lineup, since “The Office” has been paired with “My Name Is Earl” all along.

This may be a little early to start to suggest that iTunes is a wonderful promotional vehicle for TV but I suspect it is very true. Both from the perspective of music downloads which boosted CD sales some years ago and as a now dedicated iPod video watcher (yes I am regularly watching films over an hour long on the device) it creates a personal connection with linear media properties even more than owning the DVD. Would love academics out there to give me some insight into why we are more connected with something we carry with us, vs just own or vs we just enjoy through broadcast (TV and cinema distribution) – but it may be obvious. Of course we are likely to see DVD’s themselves having greater sales as the mobile generation decide they need to own a better quality version of their trusted, now personalized media. The report goes on to list other TV properties that are starting to be influenced by the iTunes phenomenom…

To date since their debut on iTunes in October, both “Lost” and “Desperate Housewives” are up versus the same period last year.
“Lost,” ABC’s most popular show in terms of downloads, has seen its total audience rise 14 percent and ratings for adults 18 to 49 are up 28 percent. “Desperate Housewives'” total audience is up 7 percent and 18 to 49 ratings are up 3 percent. ITunes downloads for both shows also rose in the last few weeks.
That growth and the knowledge that iTunes distribution possibly grew and certainly did not cannibalize ratings gave the ABC Disney Television Group the confidence to add another round of iTunes programs last week that includes content from ABC Family, Disney Channel, SoapNet, ABC Sports and ESPN, said Albert Cheng, executive VP of digital media for the Disney ABC Television Group.

For those statistically inclined the report finishes with some eye openers – this does reverberate with similar stats I recall that connected DVD and Box Office and as I mentioned before MP3 downloads and CD sales…how about the relationship between those naughtly UK and Australian TV bit torrent downloaders and TV ratings, is that where the connection breaks?

  • To date, Apple has sold 8 million TV shows through iTunes since the Oct. 12 debut of the iPod video.
  • NBC inked a deal for 12 shows on iTunes in December; added “Saturday Night Live” in early January.
  • “The Office” accounts for about one-third of NBCU content downloads via iTunes.
  • The Jan. 12 telecast of “The Office,” with a 5.1 in the 18 to 49 demo, was up 31 percent versus the season average prior to the Dec. 6 Apple launch. Before the Apple launch, “The Office” was averaging a 3.9 in the demo.
  • Only three originals of “The Office” have aired since the Apple launch. The three are up an average of 18 percent in the demo, and the show has grown every week.
  • Of course this could all be premature as often cult type programmes such as the Office or an earlier example Fawly Towers grew at each repeat season and certainly in the case of Fawlty Towers (or Flowery Twats as I so often forgetfully call it!) there were no DVD’s, iPod Vides, PSP’s or even as I recall VHS’s to buy at the time. So which is it trend analysts – do mobile watchers reduce or grow the scheduled TV audiences?
    Posted by Gary Hayes Copyright 2006

    Nov 142005

    Man and Mesquite Dunes ©Gary Hayes 2005It is starting to feel a little like one of those JFK “Everyone remembers what they were doing when…” moments. Suddenly TV is spreading across the cross-media universe like wild-fire. With TV companies moving their prized possessions onto broadband, mobile and various PVRs the Washington Post in its article “A Breakthrough Few Months for Portable TV” starts the retrospective – or alternatively a term I think coined by a BBC colleague a few years ago ‘prestalgia’.

    The autumn of 2005 will doubtless be remembered as the time when all assumptions about the rules of television were thrown into the air and scattered, with no certainty about what happens when they land.
    The most shocking event clearly was Apple’s deal with The Walt Disney Co. in October to make reruns of “Lost” and other programs available for downloading to iPods for $1.99. In less than three weeks, Apple said a million videos were sold.

    It continues by pointing out that TV broadband sites are also starting to sprout up everywhere

    That remains unanswered, but it hasn’t stopped an explosion of Internet channels or programming offerings this fall _ seemingly a new announcement every day.
    Several of the MTV Networks have launched affiliated broadband sites. 50 Cent made a concert exclusively available on MTV Overdrive, VH1 started the VSpot stream, kids can watch cartoons on TurboNick and Comedy Central’s Motherload began operating Nov. 1.
    NBC began offering a same-night replay of “Nightly News” online, the first network news broadcast to take that step. The Food Network starts a Web-only series with chef Dave Lieberman next week. HGTV debuted “My First Place,” a series about young people moving into their first homes, on the Web before TV. PBS made NerdTV, a series about high tech pioneers, available exclusively on the Internet.

    As is usual when things get a little too ‘raucous’ there is always one party pooper and this one is Broadcasting and Cables article subtitled “Hold on—maybe the Internet giants won’t take over television”

    Indeed, while the rush to air TV programs online has promotional value, it’s merely an elaborate experiment for now: Will people watch shows on their computer? Every veteran TV executive knows that any large-scale migration of a network’s best content would upset the delicate supply chain of station groups, syndicators and advertisers.
    “I don’t think we’re in favor of any tool that decides to record our content, no matter what functionality,” says Albert Cheng, executive VP of digital media at Disney/ABC. “There needs to be acknowledgement of copyright laws.”
    Also, networks worry about handing bullets to the enemy. They risk building Yahoo!, Google or Apple’s iTunes into online gatekeepers—the same sort they face in cable and DBS companies—and diluting networks’ leverage.

    The New York Times though gets the party going again and also noted the cosmological (OK just TV spreading it’s wings) event. Its article Internet Service to Put Classic TV on Home Computer on Warner Brothers latest venture shows that the tidal wave may have begun already, this writer was kind of expecting a trickle of activity off the back of the Apple, NBC and CBS announcements reported in previous posts.

    Warner Brothers is preparing a major new Internet service that will let fans watch full episodes from more than 100 old television series. The service, called In2TV, will be free, supported by advertising, and will start early next year. More than 4,800 episodes will be made available online in the first year. (snip)
    Full-length TV shows on the In2TV service responds to that demand, particularly as more people hook their computers up to their television sets.

    And like the BBC’s new IMP initiatives Warner Bros. Are reducing distribution costs by implementing existing peer-to-peer technologies

    There is a catch. To use the technology, viewers will have to agree to participate in a special file-sharing network. This approach helps AOL reduce the cost of distributing-high quality video files by passing portions of the video files from one user’s computer to another. AOL says that since it will control the network, it can protect users from the sorts of viruses and spyware that infect other peer-to-peer systems.

    To add even more excitement to the mix it looks like Interactive TV is sneaking in through this particular back door in the states. They have waited in the wings long enough behind the centre stage antics of the UK’s iTV industry so…

    Other programs will be accompanied by interactive features that can be displayed side by side with the video, like trivia quizzes and video games related to the shows. One feature, to accompany “Welcome Back, Kotter,” will allow users to upload a picture of themselves (or a friend) and superimpose 1970’s hair styles and fashion, and send the pictures by e-mail to friends or use as icons on AOL’s instant-message system.

    So remember what you were doing at the end of 2005 because the big changes are happening now. You will be able to reminisce when you are old and grey, sitting in your rocking chair as you tell your grandkids (or someone else’s grandkids) about the days when you used to have to watch your favourite TV programmes at certain times of the day – that you were there when the big switch over to broadband TV occurred (or video rather as TV will become a term less used in a few decades of course). These are strange, or rather expected times indeed.

    Posted by Gary Hayes ©2005