May 132012
 

 

 

Presenting Media140 - Photo: The Cut Creative, Perth

I keynoted at the Media140 conference three weeks ago (26 Apr 2012) wearing my ABC Exec Producer TV Multi Platform hat. Now responsible for non-kids ABC TV online & mobile offerings & TV mobile and social strategy my 20 minute talk was rather focused on the high level challenges for broadcasters trying to truly integrate fiction, factual and entertainment with social, mobile and 2nd screen (or synch services). The transcript, slideshare and more ore detail follow but first…

Absent note

…apologies to regular readers for my long absence from post on this blog. I started an ABC role back in October which overlapped with me running the Screen Australia StoryLabs weeks and as well as tidying up and finishing a range of commercial projects meant actually talking/blogging about all the stuff I have been doing in long form, has been tricky – plus there are confidentialities to take into account. The adage certainly holds true those who can, do, those who can’t, write long blog posts or podcasts on the topic 🙂 Might get flamed on that one, but I think having an hour or two to sit and post is a luxury. In other full time roles I still manage to provide a commentary into the cloud but the ABC is particularly under resourced in multi platform areas with many folk working beyond the call of duty. I am also taking advantage of my partner Laurel Papworthaway, spending a few weeks on a pilgrimage across the Camino in Spain, and doing very well with it.

Talk intro – the challenge, the hybrid and the prototyping

Also like most big media organisations the ABC is a mirror of the external larger world itself. There are silo’s, politics, technical differences across the divisions, resource scarcity, diluted budgets and linear controllers / commissioners who all need to be sold on the importance of Multi Platform and the potential of different types of services. But that means a good part of my role inside the ABC is very similar to my BBC Senior Dev Producer role, to evangelise but also implement new services. That means I am exposed to the key challenges in terms of merging or hybridising broadcast and on-demand TV with some of the key driving forces outside a broadcasters world. Without drilling down into the detail (or breaking any confidentiality!) the top level challenges for all traditionally one-way media organisations is:

  • Sorry too busy to talk – We don’t have enough people resources, social media staff, to engage in widespread, authentic, editorial conversation with our audience/users
  • Bolt on effect – Our massive internal technical infrastructure/s can’t be glued to always new, transient, multiple external services/APIs
  • That’s they way it is done – We have decades old editorial & commissioning processes in place and until any big multi-platform ‘story-telling’ breakthroughs we will need convincing of a reason for changing that
  • Multi platform and social media is really about marketing isn’t it and therefore warrants those types of relatively small budgets
  • Sure everyone is shifting attention to mobile & social but until there is zero people watching our main channels we have a job to do!
  • Rights are not set up for multi platform, period. Expensively produced linear video leads, the rest follows, still.
  • and the list goes on and on

Ok I am being a little provocative and at the ABC, I and many others are very aware of the challenges and getting on with the changes required. Alongside managing producers and resources I am able to run group workshops internally with the key show creatives and together (vs telling what we should be doing!) to slowly move forward. I also have a great role in developing working prototypes (and final services) of synchronous 2nd screen and social mobile services. Being several months into these,  I also refer to at the end of my talk of the key differences between vanilla social TV, content owner social TV, content owner driven 2nd screen storytelling and the hybrid of all of them. When someone is engaged with a great synch story experience of say tablet against TV it makes absolute sense to include social elements, for them to invite and share that experience.

I also mentioned in the talk and interviews around it about the need for content owners and broadcasters to be driving the 2nd screen experience – these have to be truly integrated story experience and although there is value in trying to layer or bolt on these synchronous services. Although voting, polling, surveying type services can work, ideally with presenter driven call to actions, many well written pieces of video do not have much ‘space’ for the interaction (or parallel narratives to ideally slot in). There are two arguments to that. Firstly formulaic storytelling combined with the distractions our already existing 2nd screen habit means we are constantly snacking on our 2nd screen anyway and ‘missing’ the important bits of the show. Secondly, in a world where on-demand, when you want it, watching is so ubiquitous, I am devising several formats where the linear video is simple paused and the interactive component has its own space to breathe in this time frozen moments. I am suggesting in all my meetings with show creatives that if possible, the best approach is to design from the ground up. But that then moves into eons old ‘commissioning’ processes and for now I won’t go there, perhaps later…OK onto the talk

Hello, Good Morning and Welcome

It was great to be in Perth again with a very enthusiastic crowd, which speaking to the folks there, encompassed most of the digital fraternity it seemed. There were many folk live blogging the event and my talk (e.g.: Sarah Tierney and Matthew Allen), I did a few small interviews (e.g.: Western Australian / Yahoo)  and at least 60% of the audience tweeting. Media140 is the brainchild of Andrew Gregson and the event was very well organised, technically and management wise. The slides below were presented on my new iPad (3) so hopefully the formatting came across OK. Transcription follows the slides

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About Gary

 Posted by on April 27, 2007 at 5:13 am  Add comments
 

Garys Full Wikipedia Profile Link.

Short Bio

Mr Gary Hayes – Founding Director Storylabs.us  and CEO MUVEDesign.com

Gary is an award winning multi-platform producer, author, educator and Director. He was recently Senior Producer and Manager of Product Development at ABC TV Multi Platform responsible for delivering new editorial formats against ABC TV shows including dual screen, social TV, games and mobile. He founded the global training group StoryLabs.us in 2010 (previously founding and running innovation lab LAMP from 2005-10) growing innovative multi-platform, game, virtual world and transmedia productions. He is also currently CEO of Augmented & Virtual Reality company MUVEDesign.com (multi user virtual environments) and creating branded & story based multi platform for major brands. Gary was previously Senior Development Producer and Manager at the BBC in UK for 8 years – delivering interactive Social TV, broadband internet and emerging platforms to millions of UK users. After 2 years in the US as interactive producer Gary then became the founding director in Australia of the Innovation Training Unit LAMP.edu.au via AFTRS between 2005-10. He recently became a Distinguished Talent permanent resident in Australia and since 2005 runs the top ten AdAge Power150 Media & Marketing blog covering personalized pervasive entertainment, personalizemedia.com. Gary designed & lectured full time multiplatform courses at MetroScreen and AFTRS and adjudicates on Virtual Reality and Multiplatform for several Government Screen funding organisations and has been an award juror for many years including the International Interactive Emmy’s and recently Banff Media.

extended bio

Mr Gary Hayes – Director MUVEDesign.com & Founder Storylabs.us

After many years working in the UK’s Music and Multimedia industry Gary joined the BBC in London as a multimedia editor and quickly became a Senior Development Producer then Manager and leading thinker in the BBC’s development of the internet, interactive TV and emerging platforms from 95-04. He devised & produced many of the BBC’s ‘firsts’ – Digital Text, the first broadcast interactive TV service – ‘Nomad’ the first live internet documentary – ‘X-Creatures’ the first broadband TV service and even introduced the first video and audio onto the BBC’s internet sites in 1996. Gary produced and devised over 20 other eTV and broadband TV services including Top of the Pops, Travel Show, State Apart and several future BBC cross-platform navigators. He also conceived with the linear show producers award winning iTV projects such as Antiques Roadshow, Walking with Beasts & various BBC iTV game formats. Gary created numerous courses and seminars on Interactive thinking for linear producers, was active in the Blue Sky Imagineering and R&D depts looking at personal TV and virtual spaces and was a leading part of BBC strategy teams from 2001 in preparing for on-demand, cross-platform services.

Living & consulting in the US during 2004-5 he line produced Showtime’s PVR enhanced L-Word, as part of AFI digital labs and devised a range of new on-demand program formats for two national TV networks. Gary also produced & chaired conferences around LA including Hollywood industry panel seminars and Digital Days both looking at emerging media super-distribution models. He also chaired the Business Models Group from 99-03 for TV-Anytime (the lead media-on-demand standards body) and co-authored a Department Trade and Industry Report on Personal Video Systems. He has been an International Interactive Emmy juror for the past three years.

Between 2005 -10  Gary was the Director the Australian Laboratory for Advanced Media Production run through AFTRS (Australian Film TV and Radio School) and based in Sydney and was probably Australia’s premier emerging media R&D and production labs. It combined seminars, workshops, immersive rapid prototyping residentials and industry focused product development. Through AFTRS he also ran workshops in multi user virtual environments (MUVE) for cinematographers, designers, script writers and directors exploring the potential of shared social online virtual spaces for collaborative production, creativity and education.

From a commercial perspective Gary is CCO and Head of Virtual Worlds with MUVEDesign (and previously the Sydney based Project Factory respectively) pioneering alternate, augmented & virtual world creation and immersive & organic story experiences for TV/Film, Education, Business & Performance. MUVEDesign are currently building and devising commercial and game-like services in Transmedia, Augmented Reality and also virtual worlds, having recently produced and built major Second Life Australian presences including Telstra, ABC, MultiMedia Victoria Laneways, Deakin University, AFTRS, Thursday’s Fictions & other Fortune 100 companies in Second Life. He runs a fictional MUVE blog JustVirtual and a renowned top 10 Australian Media and Marketing blog on media personalisation, digital brands, new media forms and creativity at www.personalizemedia.com and has presented at over 450 conferences on subjects ranging from Transmedia, Augmented Reality business, Advanced and Interactive TV, Personalization, Brands and Education in Virtual Worlds, Media Futures and Interactive Art and Music amoungst others. As a published music producer, composer and performer he has had over 200 works performed live and on TV/Film and Radio.

Contact

Take your pick from any of these emails:

  • gary @ personalizemedia.com
  • gary @ muvedesign.com
  • gary @ storylabs.us
  • mail @ garyhayes.tv
  • gary @ korkyt.net
  • gary @ justvirtual.com

Garys web universe

  • www.PersonalizeMedia.com – Gary’s main media blog. Started mid 2005
  • www.StoryLabs.us – Gary is the main founder of this global, multi platform storytelling development initiative
  • www.MUVEDesign.com – His company designing and producing Transmedia, Augmented Reality and Virtual Worlds. Started mid 2007
  • garyphayes.com – A comprehensive hub site, partly devoted to composed music and other personal creativity
  • www.Korkyt.net – Currently Gary’s Filmic Composer Site. (originally homepage/blog format started mid 1995)
  • www.GaryHayes.TV – Focus on Advanced TV blog. Started beginning 2004
  • www.JustVirtual.com – POV as Gary Hazlitt in Second Life. Started early 2006
  • www.LAMP.edu.au – The Australian leading Social & Cross Media Development Lab directed by Gary. Started mid 2005 ended 2010
  • www.TheProjectFactory.com – Gary was Head of Virtual Worlds, most video content on the site still his work. Started 2007.
  • The BBC Musical Nomad – a reconstructed blog site from a live webumentary project (live satellite blogging from Central Asia in 1997) originally at bbc.co.uk/nomad from 1997 – 2008.

Other sites & social media:

Gary’s Web 2.0/3.0 and Social Networks

Selection of wikipedia and wiki cited blog based articles (up to April 07). E.g.:

Apr 182007
 

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(Thanks to Rory Sutherland of Ogilvy for that image). A brief, as at mid conference, ones mind is too distracted to put together a reflective, long format piece for a media blog (well I suppose that’€™s the nature of blogs!) -€“ and also there is very little time to sit back and write this stuff (yes being in Cannes is not all free parties and hanging around the beaches ‘€“ well for sad people like me’ it isn’€™t 😉 ). End of second day from Milia and the week is panning out as last year into very well defined areas focusing on burning issues:

The tension between traditional TV and broadband alternatives ‘€“ several online video superpanels.
What the heck should we do next ‘€“ The pitching panels demonstrating that companies like BBC have less and less in-house creativity that can truly engage the new audience
How to reach the audience ‘€“ a good second half to Tuesday looking at new forms of marketing and advertising
Are new platforms really offering opportunities – The usual cursory look at mobile and innovative broadband web

Any way onto some things that resonated with me ‘€“ these come across as negative on re-reading, perhaps suggesting things are maturing – a sort of things to tweak as opposed to the surprise one gets when…’€œwhat TV folk are starting to think about this stuff!’€

We like to play
Before I start with these little nuggets I must say I am staggered to see the lack of acknowledgement in many of my private discussions, keynotes and panels on the impact of online games ‘€“ whether virtual world or MMORPGs. The dominance of the TV market 2 floors below in the ‘€˜car boot sale’€™ environment of MipTV suggests that until games are brought back into Milia then all the ‘€˜new’€™ stuff will be focused on how to deliver TV (programmes and commercials) to online and mobile. This is manifest in the format of the week. OK a nod to virtual worlds in a keynote and short parallel panel, but I have only once heard for example World of Warcraft mentioned and that was me in a question! Please, please organisers to ignore such a rich seam of audience activity doesn’€™t make sense. A panel called ‘€œRole of Games in Cross-Media Entertaintment’€ (featuring the switched on Deborah Todd) will I hope suggest, that TV producers will only be ready for this new world when they understand and more importantly play games themselves.

Lack of BBC Vision
The new creative director of BBC Vision (Richard Williams) actually clearly showed the BBC has little vision for future services by playing a trailer in the Commissioning for all Screens, that was circa 2003. How many times do we have to see Walking with Beasts interactive (and other tired red button apps like Death in Rome) shown as an example of the BBC responding to change? WWB iTV is actually circa 2001 when Tim Haines and I took it to the then Controller of TV, Mark Thompson but at least Richard talked about a few ‘€˜listen to the audience’€™ projects which is very hard for the BBC – “have you considered the problems of moderation?” that oft line put to projects pitched at them. Another thing that is hard is finding a way within the organization to both creatively ‘€˜grow ideas, commission and produce (to quote Richard’€¦)

‘€œ’€¦this is the first time that the BBC has actually split up its commissioning and production of new media content’€¦a fairer system, I personally think the old system was pretty fair but this is going to better we hope’€’€¦

The 360 pitching sessions are being steered by the laid back and passionate Frank Boyd. He is also running lots of Innovation labs, with apparently half of the submitted projects getting some further development ‘€“ not surprising as the submissions into the labs are likely to be all the cross-platform ideas coming into the BBC! This may suggest as I said last year, an openess and willingness to work with external producers but it also pangs of a lack of direction – I shall feedback on the pitching sessions and final evening winners in a coming post. But the BBC’s current narrow focus on a way for its audience to get at video content (eg: iPlayer and YouTube) seems to be addressing only a small part of what needs to be done and endless restructuring and shuffling of the same people (or those so-called enlightened ones from other traditional departments) will not move them forward. I get the feeling that most of the true creatives have been swept out of BBC New Media leaving ‘trusted’ producers and ‘€˜audience figure’€™ managers? I hope though to be wowed by the quality of the pitches today, Wednesday, for the various BBC categories and of course by Ashley and Jana Bennetts steerage keynotes later in the day.

We know we can deliver video online!
I attended a few of the ‘€˜online’€™ video/TV panels, but little has changed since last year and I think Ferhan should cull the video over web and mobile back a bit. The most interesting thing to come out seems to be the polarisation caused by viewer created content. It falls into two camps ‘€œits all crap and we don’€™t need to worry about it’€ or ‘€œviewers are spending more time watching this crap rather than ours!, so lets worry’€. Most folk now trip out the oft said business model mix of a bit of subscription there and a bit of ad funded here as a catch all to how the online video biz is being monetised.

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A surprising number are quick to totally dismiss pay-per-play as an effective model? This seems odd when we still live in a blockbuster age. What happened to the old keep 80% of people honest and they will not drift over to the dark side of bit torrent or pirated DVDs ‘€“ make it easy for them to stay honest. Apple/EMI strategy was given the ‘€˜ummm lets see’€™ by many yet all agreed DRM is a waste of time. In the Broadband Video Explosion SuperPanel Rick Sands (COO of MGM ‘€“ and who sounds a bit like Nick Cage) was most entertaining for the fact that he was clear that the industry is still broken into distinct parts. The Pipes, as he called them ‘€“ looking at the CEO of Joost, Fredrik De Wahl (who showed an impressive vid over web demo) ‘€“ should stay clear of content. They don’€™t understand, for example, advertising which for the most part is made by an industry where perhaps 25% actually know what they are doing’€¦which leads nicely onto’€¦

‘€œThe audience is fragmenting, fragment with them.’€ © Joseph Jaffe
Now where have I heard that before 😉 Through Tuesday afternoon a series of presenters and panels looked at new form advertising and marketing. I loved Rory Sutherland’€™s (Vice Chair Ogilvy UK) presentation which on one hand showed a disconnect ‘€“ he came across as a Lord of Advertising looking down on the sprawling proletariat hoard but on the other hand seemed very understanding and sympathetic with audience needs. I suspect those are the two key qualities of a great marketing person ‘€“ empathy combined with arms length. Other people in the marketing field though are less approachable and seem to be very nervous about what is happening, behind their thin veneer of public confidence.

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I was also struck by the alternative marketing methods that many were tripping out too. Lots of talk about longer form video across all platforms, viewers doing their own satire videos on existing media (and how we should not touch them “copying is the best form of flattery”?) or keeping an eye on what the audience is saying about them BUT as I mentioned earlier there was little talk about ‘€˜play’€™ or immersion. Branded playful adverts were hardly touched on so the whole field of ARG’€™s, Scavenger Hunts and In-Game advertising was not even skimmed over. To disregard a human’€™s desire to play seems odd for an industry aimed at fulfilling need ‘€“ this especially resonated with me when I went along to the ‘€œFreshTV presentation’€ post lunch. The WIT fronted by Virginia Mouseler presented what she/they think are the best new TV formats around the world. Not surprisingly most were cross reality/games – a new term I developed during the sessions ‘€˜Gality Show’€™ (yes it is late writing this) ‘€“ but back to advertising. Some speakers said commercials and advertising are separate ‘€“ so pay for good content and leave it alone (do not product place or steer the editorial), this seems again very odd in a world where some of the most widely viewed content is reality the most seen on-demand being ‘€˜users reality’€™ (as in user generated video about their lives) – again not referred too. So surely advertisers need to work around, within and alongside what TV is turning into. Most TV in less than 5 years will be reality focused and that means ‘€“ Sport, The Audience, Reality Game Shows, News and Reality Drama (yes endless CSI’€¦). One of the marketeers who falls into the keep ads and programmes separate is’€¦

Joseph Jaffe who delivered a nice theoretical keynote based on his now old-in-the-tooth, marketing book ‘€˜Life after the 30 second spot’€ ‘€“ already three years old. Again I often think back to the endless work/discussions that TV-Anytime and I did with advertisers circa 2001 when the impact of the PDR (Personal Digital Recorder) was documented in many forms. Much of what we see in marketing today is simply based on anytime, anywhere, anyhow media ‘€“ and more significantly how to respond to that ‘€“ this was coming over the horizon for many a decade ago, yet the same noises are still being made and combined with the obvious impact of social networks consultants have lots of work in the coming years. Something that stuck out from Joseph’€™s assertive diatribe then was that everyone in marketing, including Joseph himself, are floundering to implement real world, effective marketing strategies. How to reach out and allow audiences to reach in and knowing what to do, actually – to use his expression when describing the many media and product based companies he has talked to ‘€œhelp us understand what comes next’€. He came across as passionate about the area but the content became overtly theoretical with lots of semantic juggling and an over reliance on power ‘€˜points’€™ ‘€“ eg: the four c’€™s, acronyms EPIC, play on words Return on Experimentation (ROE) and so on. Here is a little quote that resonated

‘€œSponsor your Consumer. A lot of people talk of consumer generated content and the thing that I constantly hear is that the quality is crap, they are not producing really high quality pieces of content. But I don’€™t think consumers care. If they are producing quality or low quality commercials or content why not help them. Send them a producer, why not actually raise the collective tide and make the work better. Even if you don’€™t do that remember that consumers aren’€™t creating this for you they are creating it for themselves. Heres a good example I call sponsoring your consumer. Instead of sponsoring the Olympic Games why not sponsor that one consumer that is really passionate about something’€

I suppose like most consultants he was advertising himself (this person seems to know what they are talking about lets give them a go) without revealing steps that work. I did warm to him when he answered my question about in-game marketing and he cited a couple of reasonable examples and also gave me a copy of the book which I will virally distribute via a local library I know without a copy. There is a second book coming out called ‘€œJoin in the Conversation’€ likely about marketeers becoming part of the global discussion about everything and anything – which shows there is life after the book’€œLife after the 30 second spot’€

© Gary Hayes 2007