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Oct 232011
 

What do we really value online and can traditional publishing companies adapt quickly enough to save themselves?

Earlier this week I and a group of social media ‘influencers’ were invited to a briefing by News Ltd of their, two years in the making plans to move to Australia’s first big Freemium news content model. Basic freemium model – a range of teaser online news excerpts leading to fuller, more in-depth news stories behind a pay wall at subscription prices starting at $2.95 a week to $7.95 including the daily printed paper.

Ross Dawson, Richard Freudenstein, Tim 'Mumbrella' Burrowes - photo garyphayes

The basic details of the plan were dutifully and immediately blogged in traditional journalistic style by Ross Dawson and Tim ‘Mumbrella’ Burrowes (both featured above with Richard Freudenstein CEO of the Australian). But alternate opinions are surfacing from other online ‘influencers’ who were there – including Laurel Papworth (who just published a thoughtful Paywall for News.com and Online Community Social Media), Gavin Heaton (his tweet compilation) Tiphereth GloriaKatie ChatfieldCraig WilsonBronwen Clune and Karalee Evans. Some were feeling privileged to be at this briefing (in advance of traditional media – who of course are competitors so why not invite the ‘independent voice’) but others were confused regarding the actual value proposition being put forward.

Firstly hats off to the large News Ltd operation for taking this ‘if we don’t were damned’ and ‘if we do were also damned’, step. Also for setting up a no-mans land, bridging site, looking at the Future of Journalism. It is really the only thing they can really do at this juncture – so it all comes down to ‘how’ they do it. I and others pointed out during the session that regardless of the mammoth ‘back-end’ production, business and editorial systems upgrade, it really boils down to IF users like the taste of this particular flavour of digital content. Is there a demand for your ‘paid for’ product?

Some heritage news orgs are starting to turn the corner of this ‘experiment’ of course while others have just crashed and burned. Yesterday AdAge reported on New York Times just keeping it’s head above the water with it’s 324 000 and climbing, digital subscribers. It announced that, as it’s print ads decline by 10.4% a quarter it’s digital ads (up 6.2%) and increasing subscribers online are balancing the books, just.

Within the company’s news media division, which includes The New York Times itself as well as the Boston Globe and other newspapers, digital-ad revenue increased 6.2% — slower growth than in the second quarter — while print-ad revenue dropped 10.4% — a sharper decline than last quarter.

In a world of scarcity asking people to pay for ‘information’ or stories about themselves and the wider world makes sense. Get that. But in a world where digital, to a growing number, means free access, open re-distribution, self-publishing and outright plagiarism of those same stories, will ‘paid for news’ ever work?

Lets step back from the granularity of price points and production challenges covered by others for the moment and without getting bogged down in journalistic integrity or endless ‘manipulative’ stats, lets get back to basics.

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Oct 232011
 

I was lucky to be asked to write five articles for Wired’s Change Accelerator blog on the topic of Future of Entertainment this last week.

Guest bloggers sound off on solutions for the future. Eight change accelerators in energy, mobility and design start the conversation, and you join in.

It was certainly a challenge to not only cover the vast range of change happening but to try and combine this with some kind of narrative arc across the five posts. I deliberately kept away from areas such as AI or overtly looking at ‘gadgets or devices’ and wanted to focus on the actual user need and behaviour at a very accessible level. Also I wanted to include as many recent (the last year or so) examples of services being developed that clearly define the direction we are headed. The nice thing is the posts are brief, compared with my usual dirges!, and they seem to work well back-to-back, although quite a few ‘anomalies’ have crept in during the sub-edit process 🙂

So here is the list of my experiential & transmedia posts this week in Wired’s Change Accelerators Blog – these may be re-posted on this blog once I get the nod.

Monday – Sensory Futures, Experiential Entertainment 

Looks at the drive to more fully enclosed, sensory and imaginatively, experiences

Tuesday – Stories-To-Go. Locative Entertainment Futures

The development of narrative, game and social story spread around for us to move and play inside of

Wednesday – Personalized Entertainment – Social, Transmedia Storytelling

Our own stories merged with produced entertainment, social TV, cinema and beyond

Thursday – Through Rose-Tinted 5D Glasses – Situated Augmented Reality Entertainment 

Layering experiences over the real world, the merging of story and place

Friday – Are you Experiential? Designing for the Pervasive Entertainment Era

An article looking at the nature of experience and how we can design for the future

 

Sep 162011
 

 

nur·ture – noun /ˈnərCHər/ – The process of caring for and encouraging the growth or development of someone or something

011_Glebe Point Road Fete Sydney 2010

For multi platform storytelling and transmedia to flourish, it’s ‘creative leaders and trainers’ need to use a vast range of techniques to inspire those unfamiliar with it’s highly complex, development process. This post is relevant to all media creators – advertising campaigns, innovation in companies, story development, technical and business research who require expert help to become confident explorers and producers in this new and exciting arena. I realise as I type that the post could become rather large if I included some of my in-depth, traditional training or consultancy processes so this looks at a higher level, at the types of training, networking & development in the transmedia/multi platform content space. Cue the obligatory personal context…

Multi Media Training

When I joined the BBC as Multi Media Editor back in 1995 about half of my initial role was training BBC producers. I had already been producing multi-media content and lecturing at higher ed level for 6 years prior and was partly employed because of this skill. This was a BBC long before any Innovation labs, BBC Worldwide extensions, New Media or imagineering departments and  I and a couple of other producers with BBC training would run one to three day ’emerging media’ workshops for teams of BBC producers. Back in the day this included the Senior Management Board, David Attenborough types and later Tim Haines (walking with dinosaurs) and a multitude of other ‘get it made’ top TV exec producers. The sessions back then started from an evangelical point of view but quickly moved later in the workshops into “OK I’m sold, What can we do together now” (as is the nature of executive producer types!).

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Jul 272011
 

OK not really a Dummies guide as there are some complex elements in here,  but one has to use whatever memes are in vogue 🙂 A few weeks ago I was commissioned by Screen Australia to write a very basic structure & guide for producers relatively new to multi platform content to structure & document their propositions, after they have developed the ‘audience centric’ concepts. This has just been published on the Screen Australia site as a digital resource for those needing to document projects for transmedia productions.

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