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Transmedia-brief-o-matic

 Posted by on August 31, 2010 at 2:58 pm  Add comments
 

Welcome to my simple multi-platform, mostly commercial, transmedia ‘project’ assignment machine. As I coded this in a couple of hours there are only two sections currently:

  1. TV Extension – create/present a transmedia service, extending the given TV story and meeting the two objectives. Focus on the main objective with the major elements of your cross platform, TV extension and have at least 2 other elements refer to the secondary objective. Use the design chart below to decide on how to expand the story world. Note: currently these are Australian shows, but given 80% of Australian TV is US  or UK imports, they are broad enough for now – but you must be precise in your extension of the existing story
  2. Transmedia – create an original transmedia service (that doesn’t have a film or TV element!) using the given story world ‘suggestion/trigger’ and the two specific objectives. As in 1 focus on the main objective but with this exercise the key is to really develop something self contained and clearly look at the primary narrative existing on other platforms without the luxury of TV or Film. Also the suggested ‘story worlds’ (books and films) are there as generics and basic ‘story environment’ triggers, so for example if it says ‘Jaws’ any shark or sea predator story is acceptable.

Click the tabs attached left and right of the boxes to generate the random suggestions

Please use this image to help you decide on where aspects of the story are best placed

TranSocialMedia Story Telling Workshop Sheet

Aug 262010
 

“We live in extraordinary times and the last five years particularly, a renaissance of storytelling. We are, as we were pre-printing press days when we equally shared, enhanced and distributed the fragments of our engaging stories. Today’s technology has delivered a new spirit of connectivity, a democratisation of story given back to the ‘many’. Storytelling not at walking speed but the speed of light. You equipped to deal with this?”

OK enough opening fluff and straight to the point. I was having a chat yesterday with a colleague at Screen Australia trying to answer a simple question. Cue music…

If you have a story project, that’s a little bit ‘strange’, who ya gonna call?

Magic Point Maroubra LX3 dBW 26

Not Fearing to Tread - Photo cc GHayes

(Strange = new format, transmedia, innovative, social, game-like, fragmented.) If you have a film and TV project and you need assistance to develop the script, help with the production, work through the characterisations, get advice on Red or 3D etc: there are a zillion consultants, vocational educational courses and many willing wannabe advisors to draw on. Film, Radio & TV particularly have 100+ years of maturity so it is also pretty easy to incrementally innovate, floating in watertight boats on tried and tested waters. Sadly the options for story rich projects that fall outside the straight and narrow linear path, have a more difficult time.

To be professionally guided or get the skills to create new storytelling formats you can

  1. Get in touch with professional agencies already doing this stuff. But they are often rather busy making ends meet and engrossed in ‘transmedia’ marketing big budget or existing story brands to really give you the time and advice you need.
  2. Find a traditional academic ‘digital story – type’ course (marketed as a world first) in your local area. Spend 6 months or longer working with ‘we need to do this stuff’ academics and theorists or at best, passionate aggregators of the best ‘new story’ project trailers masquerading as educational case studies. Also these course tend to be trials and under resourced – erm not the views of me with lecturer hat on, local employers 😉
  3. Find a local specialist individual who ‘seems’ to know about this new space – very few good experienced, passionate folk about and also a bit hit and miss.
  4. Seek out a handful of seminars, short workshops or networking events around the world. There are actually very few and they are often of the evangelising vs really getting down to nitty gritty ‘storytelling’ processes.

So here we are, a great dawning of transmedia storytelling, innovative new services and products yet still no true, deep development initiatives? Academia and industry either too money-busy, unable to take risk or focused on the past to really fill in this void?

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